Do art subjects really matter?

SOMETIMES wonder which criteria candidates use when choosing subject combination.  If they did, there would be no switching from one combination to the other every other day as the fumble looking for science combinations. Probably due to the focus and attention given to science subjects in Rwanda, no doubt candidates view sciences as their only option.

SOMETIMES wonder which criteria candidates use when choosing subject combination.  If they did, there would be no switching from one combination to the other every other day as the fumble looking for science combinations.

Probably due to the focus and attention given to science subjects in Rwanda, no doubt candidates view sciences as their only option.

The juicy government sponsorships for science students have pushed many into opting for courses they know too well they cannot handle.

As if that is not enough, more parents are forcing their children to do science combinations in order to compete for government sponsorship.

I am certain if anyone sat down to chat with a few science students about their subject combinations, they would be shocked at how confused these students are—the reason for their switching from one combination to another.

However, the two genuine reasons for this problem is; the lack of career guidance in schools and the underestimated value for art subjects.

As a teacher, I was compelled to have an intensive discussion with one head teacher of a Science school. He stood in agreement with me that, there is not enough room for other options in secondary schools nationwide.

There is no room for arts, even though in reality we know otherwise. 

I strongly believe that not everyone is suited to be a doctor or scientist. My notion is that instead of pushing students to only do sciences subjects, its academically healthier to guide them towards choosing a clear path in life.

This means helping them make better choices in what they are good at, rather than making them believe that they will only have a job when they make it through secondary school and university on government sponsorship.

It’s my dream to see Music, Literature, Drama and Fine Arts established in all schools and universities in Rwanda.

Much as science subjects are relevant to the community, arts are equally important. One only needs to critically think if they are to succeed.

The challenges faced by arts students, points directly to a loophole in the system that allows more room for apportioning blame. Whichever way we look at it, the education system should be in position to address a wider community.

The author is a teacher at Kagarama secondary school

shebs10@yahoo.com

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