Education can Build a Nation

Since 19th century, education has been a typical road to the development of different nations. It has been the basis of strength and power in different dimensions of governments that fully realize their role politically, socially and economically. Socially, education has a very significant impact when it comes to shaping morals. It can lead to the decay or integration of morals, depending on how it’s delivered.

Since 19th century, education has been a typical road to the development of different nations. It has been the basis of strength and power in different dimensions of governments that fully realize their role politically, socially and economically.

Socially, education has a very significant impact when it comes to shaping morals. It can lead to the decay or integration of morals, depending on how it’s delivered.

Partly, this is why many African nations have experienced the very big deal of tribalism and divisionism.
In Rwanda, the result was the break out of the catastrophic 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

The genocide clearly explains how education falsely delivered, can disintegrate the moral conduct of a whole generation.

Of course a bad education system strongly impact the economy.

Without a proper education, people grow up without innovative minds in entrepreneurship. Some societies don’t venture into the business world, simply because they lack the skill to creatively sustain or build their communities.

Thus, they remain rigid in their minds.
However, we are now liberated Rwandans who understand the useful nature of education and not what it failed to do in with our older generation.

When education is keenly and valuably run it becomes incomparable, like a gold mine. In fact, if executed systematically in the minds of Rwanda’s young generation, very soon we will start reaping the fruits of our hard work.

Go for it, struggle for its quality, for education is the foundation for pursuing one’s dreams.  It demonstrates that to realize one’s destiny is the person’s only obligation, thus a guide to simplified purpose driven lives. 

‘Education is the burning factor of persistence on the way to private and public victory and decolonizing the mind,’ as Ngugi Wa Thiong’o has suggested. 

Indeed, teachers are more or less like pregnant women. You cannot predict what they will produce by merely looking at them.

But the fact is that they bear entrepreneurs, doctors, future leaders and all other professions imaginable; thus, they deserve of care and respect from everyone.   

The author is a student at Sonrise High School

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