What do you consider a “dirty job”?

What you may call  “dirty jobs”, may actually be a blessing and a respective type of trade. Linda Mbabazi asked some Rwandans what they think of the whole “dirty jobs” phenomenon.

What you may call  “dirty jobs”, may actually be a blessing and a respective type of trade. Linda Mbabazi asked some Rwandans what they think of the whole “dirty jobs” phenomenon.

“The terminology “dirty job”, is not appropriate and is subjected to a mentality that needs to be changed.  The Rwandan active population is above 4.5 millions and it is impossible for all of them to work in offices or to be employees—many of them are self-employed. It Those, who are self-employed earn more than most of those working in offices. Working in saloons, automobile mechanics, waitress in restaurants and hotels, earn much than one can ever think. A 2007 report on informal sector survey showed that the median value added per employee in informal sector (not illegal), where many so-called dirty jobs are found, is part 137 113frw per month. Everyone should feel free to perform any productive job and be proud of it. There should be nothing like dirty or underestimate jobs. By the end of the day, work is about satisfying human needs.”

NGOBOKA François, Coordinator of Employment and Entrepreneurship Promotion in the Ministry of Public Service and Labour.


“Some Rwandans have got a low mindset towards work. Such persons think that work is only working from offices, because they don’t want to be stressed, running around.
People, who work in restaurants or bars, are usually underestimated. They are looked upon as “Ababoyi”, literally translated to mean (maid or servant).
Surprisingly, underestimated jobs pay handsomely. Many former hotel workers have a success story to tell.
We should stop undermining jobs, as long as they are officially permitted and can earn one a living.”

J. de Dieu Mbarushimana

 

“Bar attendants are often underestimated, and we are sometimes sexually harassed by clients, because they take us to be easy-goers. They don’t consider us respectable people. I really hate that! We deserve some respect. Working in a bar doesn’t mean that you’re a sex worker; it’s a job like other legal jobs.”

Florence Mukamusangwa,  bar attendant, Regina Pacis Bar in Kimironko.  

“Bar attendants are often underestimated, and we are sometimes sexually harassed by clients, because they take us to be easy-goers. They don’t consider us respectable people. I really hate that! We deserve some respect. Working in a bar doesn’t mean that you’re a sex worker; it’s a job like other legal jobs.”

Florence Mukamusangwa,  bar attendant, Regina Pacis Bar in Kimironko.  


“The kind of job I do is underestimated, and it doesn’t pay worth our energy. We help people to carry their shopping but they mistreat us, certainly they don’t know that they can’t live without us.”

Thierry Ndawimana, 17, an errand-boy at Kimironko central market.  


“It’s true; very many people undermine my job. But I believe in working than sitting at home. I can’t let fate determine my future.
I have to use my energy and brains for survival.”

Eric Rugira, 16, an errand boy of “Imbarazigihugu” Cooperative.


“I pity people, especially mothers, who expect their husbands to provide everything for the family. For heaven’s sake, why would someone physically normal choose to sit at home from January to January, because they can’t take up this or that job?
 I have to work harder to sustain my family.  I challenge women to go for any productive activity, regardless of how the society perceives it.”

Dominique Mukamukundwa, sells eggs in Kimironko Centre market.


“I have a job, then why listen to people’s opinions about it?  Sometimes it beats my understanding to see someone who is physically and mentally fit, choosing to engage in unlawful practices, like selling their bodies, because they don’t want to do the so-called cheap jobs, yet they are clean.”

Charlotte Nsaguye, In charge of the Restaurant at Hotel des Mille Colline.

Ends

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