An apple a day

Early to bed and early to rise, makes man healthy, happy and wise, the other one was an apple a day keeps the doctor away. These are words I used to sing in my early years every morning when I was preparing to go to school. A song that I had so long forgotten to sing, were reminded to me recently when my doctor told me to reduce my weight by almost 35 kilos, because of high blood pressure, a condition which can trigger so many others to follow suit, I now take my tea sugarless, have stopped snacking in between meal time, but what was most difficult for me was to stop eating the French fries, oh! How I use to love them!

Early to bed and early to rise, makes man healthy, happy and wise, the other one was an apple a day keeps the doctor away. These are words I used to sing in my early years every morning when I was preparing to go to school. A song that I had so long forgotten to sing, were reminded to me recently when my doctor told me to reduce my weight by almost 35 kilos, because of high blood pressure, a condition which can trigger so many others to follow suit, I now take my tea sugarless, have stopped snacking in between meal time, but what was most difficult for me was to stop eating the French fries, oh! How I use to love them!

To say that I now follow my doctor’s advice religiously is an understatement, also thanks to my basket playing daughter who is always on my side to wake me up so that we go for that rigorous 2 hour exercise every morning before she goes for her training. Since I started my regimen, what more can I say?  I have become lighter and happier.

Most of us who find themselves having pumped up those extra kilos, is made by the life we now live in, everywhere we go we use a car or any other public means, if it is an office job, then it is even made worse, because we eat a lot in the offices and use very little energy, and that is when you find all your clothes are becoming smaller by day- because all food eaten during the day has not been utilised.

I used to wonder why my uncle who is well past his prime walks to and from his place of work or even from kimironko to town! He has continued to look younger than his age, while we are getting older at a very fast rate.

There are so many diseases related to poor lifestyle that if one is not careful they can find themselves in deep trouble than they anticipated in matters of good health.

Healthy eating is not about strict nutrition philosophies, staying unrealistically thin, or depriving yourself of the foods you love. Rather, it’s about feeling great, having more energy, and keeping yourself as healthy as possible – all which can be achieved by learning some nutrition basics and incorporating them in a way that works for you.

Choose the types of foods that improve your health and avoid the types of foods that raise your risk for such illnesses as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. Expand your range of healthy choices to include a wide variety of delicious foods.

Learn to use guidelines and tips for creating and maintaining a satisfying, healthy diet.

Here are some tips for how to choose foods that improve your health and avoid foods that raise your risk for illnesses while creating a diet plan that works for you.

Eat enough calories but not too many. Maintain a balance between your calorie intake and calorie expenditure—that is, don’t eat more food than your body uses.

The average recommended daily allowance is 2,000 calories, but this depends on your age, sex, height, weight, and physical activity Eat a wide variety of foods. Healthy eating is an opportunity to expand your range of choices by trying foods—especially vegetables, whole grains, or fruits—that you don’t normally eat.

Keep portions moderate, especially high-calorie foods. In recent years serving sizes have ballooned, particularly in restaurants.

Choose a starter instead of an entrée, split a dish with a friend, and don’t order supersized anything.

Eat plenty of fruits, vegetables, grains, and legumes—foods high in complex carbohydrates, fiber, vitamins, and minerals, low in fat, and free of cholesterol. Try to get fresh, local produce.

Drink more water. Our bodies are about 75% water. It is a vital part of a healthy diet. Water helps flush our systems, especially the kidneys and bladder, of waste products and toxins.

A majority of people go through life dehydrated.
Limit sugary foods, salt, and refined-grain products.   Sugar is added to a vast array of foods. In a year, just one daily 12-ounce can of soda (160 calories) can increase your weight by 16 kilos.

Limiting salt and substituting whole grains for refined grains is also encouraged.

Don’t be the food police. You can enjoy your favorite sweets and fried foods in moderation, as long as they are an occasional part of your overall healthy diet. Food is a great source of pleasure, and pleasure is good for the heart – even if those French fries aren’t!

Do some exercise. A healthy diet improves your energy and feelings of well-being while reducing your risk of many diseases. Adding regular physical activity and exercise will make any healthy eating plan work even better.

One step at a time. Establishing new food habits is much easier if you focus on and take action on one food group or food fact at a time and stop snacking in between meals.
Eating smart: A key step towards healthy eating
Healthy eating begins with learning how to “eat smart”. It’s not just what you eat, but how you eat.

Paying attention to what you eat and choosing foods that are both nourishing and enjoyable helps support an overall healthy diet.

• Take time to chew your food: Chew your food slowly, savoring every bite. We tend to rush though our meals, forgetting to actually taste the flavors and feel the textures of what is in our mouths. Reconnect with the joy of eating.

• Avoid stress while eating: When we are stressed, our digestion can be compromised, causing problems like colitis and heartburn. Avoid eating while working, driving, arguing, or watching TV (especially disturbing programs or the news).

Try taking some deep breaths prior to beginning your meal, or light candles and play soothing music to create a relaxing atmosphere.

• Listen to your body: Ask yourself if you are really hungry. You may really be thirsty, so try drinking a glass of water first. During a meal, stop eating before you feel full.

It actually takes a few minutes for your brain to tell your body that it has had enough food, so eat slowly. Eating just enough to satisfy your hunger will help you remain alert, relaxed and feeling your best, rather than stuffing yourself into a “food coma”!

• Eat early, eat often: Starting your day with a healthy breakfast can jumpstart your metabolism, and eating the majority of your daily caloric allotment early in the day gives your body time to work those calories off.

Also, eating small, healthy meals throughout the day, rather than the standard three large meals, can help keep your metabolism going and ward off snack attacks.
Let us start this journey together as we strive for a healthy nation.

Ends

Subscribe to The New Times E-Paper


You want to chat directly with us? Send us a message on WhatsApp at +250 788 310 999    

 

Follow The New Times on Google News