WILDLIFE DISCOVERY:Turkeys; The gobbling birds

Speaking of Turkeys, to we are reminded of several occasions like Christmas, thanksgiving and parties that cannot go without a tasty turkey meal.

Speaking of Turkeys, to we are reminded of several occasions like Christmas, thanksgiving and parties that cannot go without a tasty turkey meal.

These huge birds are categorized into domestic and wild turkeys. Domestic turkeys are twice heavier than wild turkeys. Domestic turkeys are reared on farms for profit because they are heavy and are unable to fly.

On the other hand, wild turkeys are found in the woods of Northern America and are the largest game birds found in this area. These large beautiful birds are also native to Africa.
They are covered with dark feathers which help them to blend within the woods. Domestic turkeys have lighter colours like white or gray and black at times.

These huge birds have a bare skin on the throat and head. When they get distressed or excited, their skin colour on the heads and neck changes from gray to striking shades like red, white and blue.

A male Turkey is called a Tom, a female one is a hen while the little ones are known as poults. Male turkeys are also called ‘gobblers’ because of the ‘gobble’ sound they make.

Before laying eggs, the female turkey prepares a beautiful nest. She incubates 18 eggs at a time. After one month, the babies are hatched. In their first days, they are unable to go out, but after two weeks they go out to graze with their mother.

Just like chickens, turkeys feed on corn, seeds, small insects and wild berries for the wild turkeys.

Like peacocks, turkeys use their elegant tail to attract mates and attention. They proudly spread their tail feathers.
Turkeys are color sensitive birds.

If a person puts on red, they will run after them thinking it is an attack they are wedging. And blue means friendship and peace for them.

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