Removal of the foreskin can greatly reduce the spread of HIV

Male circumcision is the surgical removal of all or part of the foreskin of the penis. There are several biological explanations as to why this operation may reduce the risk of HIV infection. Removal of the foreskin reduces the ability of HIV penetrating into the skin of the penis.

Male circumcision is the surgical removal of all or part of the foreskin of the penis.

There are several biological explanations as to why this operation may reduce the risk of HIV infection. Removal of the foreskin reduces the ability of HIV penetrating into the skin of the penis.

So it is remarkable that human history has had many crazes for cutting the foreskin off. Three cultures began circumcision, in Africa, Australia and the Pacific.

The African custom seems to have been taken through Egypt to the Middle East and then to Europe and in the 19th century in England and the US it was taken into medicine with the aim of preventing masturbation, and so became widespread throughout the English-speaking world.
It is still claimed to prevent or cure whatever sickness people most fear at the time.

Another possible explanation is that small tears on the delicate skin of the inner surface of the foreskin during sexual intercourse could allow a portal of entry for HIV.

Men with a foreskin are more prone to have some infections, including sexually transmitted infections, which can enhance HIV transmission.

Male circumcision is associated with a much lower risk of penile cancer. Several studies now suggest that female partners of circumcised men have a lower risk of cancer of the cervix.

Demand for male circumcision as a method of combating HIV/Aids is likely to increase dramatically. According to Prof. David Gisselquist, he found out that 3.5% of circumcised men in Rwanda are HIV-infected, compared to only 2.1% of intact (non-
Circumcised) men.

That being so, it is folly to suggest that mass circumcision should be undertaken to prevent the spread of HIV/Aids. UN Aids country programme coordinator, Dr Kékoura Kourouma, advises Rwandans to start circumcision with children.

However, he admits that circumcision does not provide full protection against the spread of the virus (about half as much protection as condoms, if the three non-blinded randomized clinical tests are correct, and if they translate accurately into real life).

  The male human foreskin or prepuce is remarkable. Far from being "Just a flap of skin," it amounts to about 100 sq cm (15 sq inches) or about half the outer surface of the adult penis. It is rich in specialized sensory nerves, and has a unique way of unrolling.

As Dr Hugh Young Says “Male circumcision provides a degree of protection against acquiring HIV infection equivalent to what a vaccine of high efficacy would have achieved. Consequently male circumcision should be regarded as an important public health intervention for preventing the spread of HIV.”

He went on saying that “many medical reasons look convincing, but in each case, the science is bad.

For example, cancer of the penis is often given as a reason, but it is very rare indeed, less common than breast cancer in men, yet nobody ever suggests cutting off men's or boys' breasts to prevent it.

It mainly strikes very old men so it is with HIV/Aids”.  He revealed.

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