Fallout from the Arab Spring gains momentum

When many Arab countries took to the streets to kick out autocratic regimes, little did they know what was in store for them. The reasons why many have failed to stabilise is that there was no cohesion in the first place to guide their revolutions. In fighting, ideological and religious bickering was the icing on the cake for what appears to be a very difficult spring this year. The biggest worry that is looming large is the threat of religious fundamentalists who have emerged as forces to be reckoned with now that they are armed to the teeth and are seeking to spread their influence. Mali and Nigeria easily come to mind and the Al Shabab is not yet dead.

When many Arab countries took to the streets to kick out autocratic regimes, little did they know what was in store for them.

The reasons why many have failed to stabilise is that there was no cohesion in the first place to guide their revolutions. In fighting, ideological and religious bickering was the icing on the cake for what appears to be a very difficult spring this year.

The biggest worry that is looming large is the threat of religious fundamentalists who have emerged as forces to be reckoned with now that they are armed to the teeth and are seeking to spread their influence. Mali and Nigeria easily come to mind and the Al Shabab is not yet dead.

Most of the weapons  doing the rounds in these regions are strongly believed to be hand-me-downs from the Arab Spring, which many countries were ready to fund without thinking of the dangers of supplying sophisticated weaponry to ragtag groups.

An answer should be found for the weapons that have been dumped on our continent; this is real and present danger that countries, especially the African Union, should take into account seriously, otherwise it will be caught on the wrong footing and act when it is too late.

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