If your car is dirty, don’t enter Kigali

Of recent there have been spates of controversial regulations put up by the City of Kigali that have not gone down well with some members of the public. Most of the instructions are put into practice only to be rescinded over public uproar, but the city always has another surprise up its sleeve. The latest is a crackdown on dirty cars. The police will pull you up if your car is dirty and write you a hefty ticket. The regulation becomes quite ridiculous when you try to enforce it in the rainy season and most roads are muddy.

Of recent there have been spates of controversial regulations put up by the City of Kigali that have not gone down well with some members of the public.

Most of the instructions are put into practice only to be rescinded over public uproar, but the city always has another surprise up its sleeve.

The latest is a crackdown on dirty cars. The police will pull you up if your car is dirty and write you a hefty ticket. The regulation becomes quite ridiculous when you try to enforce it in the rainy season and most roads are muddy.

Whether it is to be believed or, it is alleged that even trucks that ferry building materials and rocks are the target of traffic policemen.

If city authorities want to keep it clean, there are better ways than using heavy handedness; it becomes counterproductive because those targeted will feel victimized by restrictive and unjust city by-laws. 

The citizens are caught between a rock and a hard place; on one hand, EWSA has failed to satisfy water demand and  REMA has banned car washes in the marshlands that used to serve as washing bays, and the police are lurking ready to pounce on the “un-presentable” vehicle.

In this rainy season, the public would be better serviced if, instead of hunting for dirty cars, the police would check that tires are not worn out to handle the slippery surfaces, otherwise, rain is an act of nature, it should not be turned into a villain.

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