FOCUS : Why parents should interact with their children

At times, parents are occupied with work in ordr to meet the basic family needs. But this implies that they hardly have time for their children, and this has far reaching implications on the upbringing of the kids.

At times, parents are occupied with work in ordr to meet the basic family needs. But this implies that they hardly have time for their children, and this has far reaching implications on the upbringing of the kids.

“Both my mother and father wake up early in the morning to go for work. I miss my parents because when I come back from school, they are at work. And I go to bed before they come yet they leave very early in the morning the next day,” says Joan Mutesi, 12, in primary six.

She explains that to at least have a glance or share few words with her parents, she makes sure is up very early. She says that “If I do not do this, I miss them for the whole week.”

Although positive changes have driven women into the competitive labour industry, and led to various achievements, those sharing Mutesi’s experience, dig out the negative side.

Children in most cases have been left for maids, who are also children in some cases, although they might be slightly older. It is no doubt that people in the same age group go through similar challenges which need to be at least handled by an elder.

Anestine UWamahoro, 20, works as a maid. She says that she is responsible for keeping a home of a single parent (Mother).

She says that she is kept busy with a lot of work which includes cleaning the house, compound, washing clothes and going for shopping among others. She explains that because of too much work it sometimes appears like the day is too short.

“Sometimes I am forced to believe the clock is not counting right, this is after assuming it is rushing when I still have a lot to do before it comes to 6p.m,” Wamahoro says
Uwamahoro, admits that there is no time she sits down to give a word of advice or guide the three little school children she takes care of when they get back from school.

“It’s not that I do not want to share life experiences with these children, but I lack the time to sit down with them, since I am occupied to make sure I satisfy my boss.” 

Justine (not her real name) a mother of four and a businesswomen says that although taking care of children is necessary, looking for their daily bread is as well important.

“Yes, I am fully aware of my responsibilities as a mother, but I am sometimes caught up in business as a way of looking for what they (Children) have to eat, drink, clothing and buying scholastic materials.”

She states that women have to utilize the chance and work even harder.

The Minister of Gender and Family Promotion, Dr. Jean d’Arc Mujawamariya, notes that although parents have to work hard, they should also create a balance between work and taking care of their families, urging that this will curb and help prepare or bring up children who will benefit their families as well as the country.

“Yes, mothers have to work, but as a measure of bringing up well-behaved children who will benefit both their families and this country, they should have a balance between work and fulfilling their family obligations,” she says.

“Parents are regulators who need to closely differentiate between the needs of children from what they want.”
Mujawamariya notes that children have also been taken up with watching television or movies to which she advises that “parents should also be vigilant on which type of shows these children watch.”

She points out that “there should be selection in what children have to watch.” And according to her, an hour should be the maximum time a child should watch either a movie or television.

mugoyag@yahoo.com

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