Experts want survey on Genocide remains

Genocide experts have called on the government to conduct a nationwide survey of all memorial sites to inspect the condition of remains. In a communiqué issued yesterday at the end of a two-day International conference on conservation of Genocide evidence at the Kigali Serena Hotel, participants said that this would enable existing Genocide evidence to be preserved while deteriorating ones are buried.
Participants in the two-day International conference on conservation of Genocide evidence at the Kigali Serena Hotel pose for souvenir photo (Photo G.Barya)
Participants in the two-day International conference on conservation of Genocide evidence at the Kigali Serena Hotel pose for souvenir photo (Photo G.Barya)

Genocide experts have called on the government to conduct a nationwide survey of all memorial sites to inspect the condition of remains.

In a communiqué issued yesterday at the end of a two-day International conference on conservation of Genocide evidence at the Kigali Serena Hotel, participants said that this would enable existing Genocide evidence to be preserved while deteriorating ones are buried.

The meeting brought together forensic anthropologists from the USA to discuss among others; the scientific and technical options of conserving human remains as well as finding the costs of the options of conserving the remains.

“A feasibility study of physical Genocide evidence preservation should be conducted as soon as possible to advise the government as far as the costs are involved,” the statement reads in part.

Alan Mcclue, a fellow of the Forensic Institute of Cranfield University, said that the costs will be established by the National Commission for the Fight against Genocide (CNLG) but that his University will offer advice on the costing process.

The Commission was also asked to conduct a consultative meeting with stakeholders and civil society, especially the Genocide survivors association (IBUKA).

As a measure of conserving Genocide evidence, participants who also included government officials, requested CNLG to collect names, photos and identity cards of Genocide victims to be displayed in selected parts of the memorial centres.

The experts also requested the government to upgrade the existing forensic laboratory to include DNA analysis that will help Genocide survivors easily identify their relatives who passed away.

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