Train local workforce to think globally

Everywhere around the world, you will hear managers telling their employees that they need to think globally. This makes sense, considering how technology has effectively reduced the world to roughly the size of your average office building.

Everywhere around the world, you will hear managers telling their employees that they need to think globally.

This makes sense, considering how technology has effectively reduced the world to roughly the size of your average office building.

However, simply telling your employees that they need to think globally and expecting them to magically do so is practically unworkable since everyone is able to do something after getting trained in that particular field.

When building training programs, training managers should focus on five key skills and knowledge areas: business mindset, communication skills, strategic/critical thinking skills, collaboration and cooperation, and individual expertise.

Getting your organization’s employees to think globally isn’t as easy as it sounds, and it isn’t something they’ll be able to do overnight.

It requires a new set of skills and a new mindset. In other words, it requires a business mind set.

Business mindset puts aside the technical abilities that many employees rely on and focuses on the other types of skills required to be successful in their work such as communication, leadership, and an ability to think strategically.

These skills are becoming increasingly vital to worldwide organizations as the task of operating in the global marketplace creates so many unique challenges.

So with all this, there is every reason as the head of the organization to train the workers if they are to move at the same pace with the fast moving globe.

Training is the process of increasing the knowledge and skills for doing a particular job. It is an organized procedure by which people learn knowledge and skill for a definite purpose.

The purpose of training is basically to bridge the gap between job requirements and the actual present competence of an employee.

Training basically aims at improving the behavior and performance of an individual. It is a continuous process which is closely related with education and development but needs to be differentiated from these terms.

Training and development of employees is beneficial to both the employees and the company in a variety of ways. For example, it frequently enhances employee job satisfaction, morale and motivation.

It also improves process efficiency, which leads to financial gain, and encourages the learning of new technologies and methodology, which can result in increased strategic innovation.

Companies should not see trainings as an optional cost that may or may not be advantageous. Rather, they need to see trainings as a true investment that may be costly but will also support continued growth.

These companies should also recognize that such training is essential for promoting a culture of learning in order to keep one step ahead of the competition.

When developing a training program, an organization should first determine its needs, since it will not have unlimited resources at its disposal.

Employees need to know why the training is being provided and the company’s expectations of their additional learning.
When training is provided in an organization, top-quality trainers should be hired and the best materials provided.

The classes need to be conducted in a quiet and comfortable location which will facilitate the ease the learning process.

When the training is completed, its effectiveness needs to be measured and changes made where necessary.

Nevertheless, training needs to be conducted for everyone in an organization.

From new employees, who need an overview of the products, services, customers and vendors, to middle managers, who need the tools to continue their growth and advancement, and to senior managers, who need to regularly be reminded of leadership values and business ethics.

The writer is a Business Administration student
Email: charlesprinc@gmail.com