A VOTE OF CONFIDENCE IN RWANDA’S WOMEN

The announcement by the World Trade Organisation (WTO) Director-General, Pascal Lamy, that he will be retaining Valentine Sendanyoye Rugwabiza as his deputy, is a vote of confidence in the abilities of Ms Rugwabiza and Rwanda as a country. It speaks volumes about the competence and hard work of the Rwandan representative to the WTO. At the same time it vindicates the decision by the Rwandan leadership to empower women by availing them leadership opportunities. This has demonstrated that given the opportunity, women can break barriers and do whatever they set their sights on. Rugwabiza has had a successful private and public sector career and her success at the international stage is not surprising.

The announcement by the World Trade Organisation (WTO) Director-General, Pascal Lamy, that he will be retaining Valentine Sendanyoye Rugwabiza as his deputy, is a vote of confidence in the abilities of Ms Rugwabiza and Rwanda as a country.

It speaks volumes about the competence and hard work of the Rwandan representative to the WTO. At the same time it vindicates the decision by the Rwandan leadership to empower women by availing them leadership opportunities. This has demonstrated that given the opportunity, women can break barriers and do whatever they set their sights on.

Rugwabiza has had a successful private and public sector career and her success at the international stage is not surprising. It is expected given her track record. Her success and that of other women in Rwanda, should serve as a source of inspiration to the young in the country. She in effect is a role model to the female generation both in school and those just embarking on their careers.

The success of such women like Rugwabiza in the public domain, should also be instructive to others as it demonstrates that the call to public service is a great calling, and at the same time rewarding both professionally and at the individual level.

It is also important to note the paramount role of Least Developed Countries in International Trade. Though developing countries control a small portion of world trade, they are important partners as emerging markets and this is being recognized.

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