Nobel Peace Prize 2007 a boon to nature conservation

The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided that the Nobel Peace Prize for 2007 is shared in two equal parts, between Albert Arnold (Al) Gore Jr. and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC); for their efforts in building and disseminating greater knowledge about man-made climate change, and laying foundations for the measures that are needed to counteract such change.

The Norwegian Nobel Committee has decided that the Nobel Peace Prize for 2007 is shared in two equal parts, between Albert Arnold (Al) Gore Jr. and the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC); for their efforts in building and disseminating greater knowledge about man-made climate change, and laying foundations for the measures that are needed to counteract such change.

The Nobel Peace Prize comes at the time when the East and Central African states are facing the challenges of migrations due to harsh climatic conditions, scarcity of resources, diseases and insecurity in the region and its neighbourhoods.

Now that Al Gore Jr. is awarded for his love of Nature, it’s high time we awakened to his vision for Africa: ‘A stable, democratic and economically growing Africa that will be a force for peace and a better partner in the fight against the transnational threats such as infectious diseases and environmental degradation that have plagued Africa’.

The Nobel Peace Prize finally addresses the security threats that must be dealt with if lives of Africans are to be improved – extensive climate changes and large-scale migration.

By awarding the Nobel Peace Prize for 2007 to the IPCC and Al Gore, the Norwegian Nobel Committee is seeking to contribute to a sharper focus on the process and decisions that appear to be necessary to protect the world’s population and future climate, and thereby to reduce the threat of mankind and natural resource extinction.

However, the none - existence of any African figure on the Nobel Prize Announcements list for 2007 is word enough for die-hards of continental unification to be more Pan-African and do something extra to protect the environment; this is the earth’s future resource that must be treated with utmost seriousness.

There is a bigger connection between human activities and global warming that has resulted into the consequences of extensive climate changes and large-scale migration.
Just as Al Gore said, “Time is running out, and we still haven’t done anything.”

The lasting peace and prosperity for Africa will be possible only when the continent is fully protected from harsh environmental and climate conditions that have claimed lives of potential pillars in the African states.
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