Don’t fault media for not covering religious issues

Editor, Allow me to respond to Martin Semukanya’s article, “Shouldn’t the media rather cover religion more?” (The New Times, August 25).
Some of the believers who turned up for the Rwanda Shima Imana conference at Amahoro stadium recently. TKisambira.
Some of the believers who turned up for the Rwanda Shima Imana conference at Amahoro stadium recently. TKisambira.

Editor,

Allow me to respond to Martin Semukanya’s article, “Shouldn’t the media rather cover religion more?” (The New Times, August 25).

I wish to disagree with Mr Semukanya. At a time when there were pretty much three groups; Catholics, Anglicans and Muslims, it was somewhat feasible for the media to allocate resources to cover religion.

However, today any Tom, Dick and Harry can open a church and have events to celebrate the days they consider sacred. And so the onus should be on the religious groups to do their own publicity.

Also, I’m all for separation of church and state.

Bruce, Rwanda

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I fully agree with Bruce on the need for complete separation of church and state affairs, while also recognising the state’s right—no obligation—to ensure that those who found and/or run churches respect the law of the land in every way, as any other human or corporate citizen.

This duty of protection includes shielding citizens from the many tricksters passing themselves off as preachers in order to pluck the feathers of those who are easily taken in by all manner of blathering spiritual mumbo-jumbo.

Mwene Kalinda, Rwanda

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Why should the media cover religious activities? What is the use of fellowship then? Like the writer said, our media is interested in covering popular news like sports and entertainment. A religious story wouldn’t sell; yet for media houses to survive, they must sell.

Whoever wants religious literature should read The Bible, Koran or Torah. Whoever wants religious news should go to church, mosque or synagogue.

I have listened to and read religious news in Rwanda before and it is always statistically biased, lacks in depth knowledge of subject matter and in most cases is stale.

James Munanura, Rwanda

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I am really sad about how in Rwanda we tend to mix religion and politics...and social affairs.

Religion is based on beliefs; I understand we have to respect other’s beliefs, and I personally do, but I am strongly against religion in politics, religion in public media, and religion in public schools.

We should learn how to live with each other, create a stronger community based on values and real knowledge. We should stop scaring our children telling them they will go to hell if they do or do not do this or that.  

We should instead teach them that if they don’t do good things they will fail as persons, and their family, community and country, will in the end pay the price.

Anya, Rwanda

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