A united religious community helps a country to heal and move forward

Religious fanaticism is rocking many corners of the world today, killing in the name of God.

Religious fanaticism is rocking many corners of the world today, killing in the name of God.

Boko Haram, Al Qaeda in the Maghreb and Al Shabab, all claim to be fighting for the establishment of Sharia Law in Africa. The Islamic State of Iran and Syria (ISIS) puts forward the same reasons in their occupation of large swaths of territories in both countries.

The Israel- Palestinian conflict is no longer strictly ideological, it has been overtaken by religious twists that threaten to complicate the situation even further.

The list of religious differences dividing communities is endless, but Rwanda seems to be taking the opposite direction. And it has tangible reasons for taking that route.

While there is an all round religious harmony and tolerance, the country’s woes in the past were always linked to the influence of churches, especially the Catholic Church.

During the Genocide, the clerics were silent and in many cases complicit, but it has taken decades for them to come to terms with their failures; at least they have began to break the ice.

For the past few years, religious denominations have been coming together every year for thanksgiving and to pray for their country, but this year, they went a notch higher. They ate humble pie and sought forgiveness for their shortcomings and the crimes committed by their colleagues.

That is the first step of healing and they should be commended.

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