Local drone maker should serve as an inspiration

The story of a young Rwandan man who is developing drones is one of the best things reported in the media for a long time.

The story of a young Rwandan man who is developing drones is one of the best things reported in the media for a long time.

It was a welcome development, away from the gloomy news of the “untouchable” militia in eastern DRC, Ebola and the accidents that have of recent taken centre stage.

The 23-year old US-trained Electrical Engineer has brought new meaning to technological transfer, by applying what he has learnt instead of being contented with his academic credentials.

The young company deserves all the help that the government and private sector can muster because it is a pioneer in design and manufacturing – from scratch.

While the word ‘drone’ has taken on a negative connotation because of its destructive use by the world’s super powers, it has useful attributes. 

The agriculture sector could use drones to spray large tracts of crops more efficiently and security personnel could easily monitor our porous borders for any illegal activities. It can even be used to monitor the movement of animals in national parks – its uses are unimaginable.  

In the developed world, private firms are usually the main financial backers for technological innovations, especially in research. It is time African countries took a leaf from this kind of partnership. 

The drone venture should not just end in awe by a public not accustomed to seeing homegrown technology, but should be regarded as a beacon for the young generation to follow suit.

ADVERTISEMENT