US-Africa relations should be guided by mutual respect

Editor, Reference is made to Junior Sabena Mutabazi’s article, “US-Africa Leaders’ Summit: why now?” (The New Times, August 7).
African heads of state with US President Barack Obama during the summit. Courtesy.
African heads of state with US President Barack Obama during the summit. Courtesy.

Editor,

Reference is made to Junior Sabena Mutabazi’s article, “US-Africa Leaders’ Summit: why now?” (The New Times, August 7).

It is illegal for any foreigner, foreign entity or any American agent of a foreign government or other entity to interfere or involve themselves in US electoral or any other political processes.

Why then does the US Government or its official or covert agencies or their so-called non-government organisations (which in reality act in close concert with the US Government) believe they themselves are entitled to interfere or involve themselves in the political processes of other countries?

On what grounds do they want us to accept that what is not good for the American goose is so for the foreign gander?

African governments and Africans in general must make it amply clear; we want to be partners with any and everyone on mutually beneficial grounds, without discrimination and on the basis of reciprocal respect.

The majority of our countries paid heavily to free ourselves from colonial domination to then willingly hand ourselves into new foreign subjugation.

Free commerce among sovereign nations is what we Africans seek, not a new master to order us around and determine our destinies. We hope our American friends understand that.

Mwene Kalinda, Rwanda

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