Unmasking Rwanda’s detractors would allow truth to prevail

Editor, Reference is made to Junior Sabena Mutabazi’s article, “Hands off our generation: the only way is up” (The New Times, July 17). Spot on, I must say.
A section of youthful participants during a past liberation anniversary event, part of the kwibuka20 conversations. File.
A section of youthful participants during a past liberation anniversary event, part of the kwibuka20 conversations. File.

Editor,

Reference is made to Junior Sabena Mutabazi’s article, “Hands off our generation: the only way is up” (The New Times, July 17). Spot on, I must say.

Naturally, Rwanda’s democratic and justice systems can be further developed. And the same goes not only for countries that we usually think of when discussing progress in the rule of law (in Asia, Southern America, Eastern Europe), but even for those that have established democratic systems for hundreds of years (USA, Western Europe).

That’s because having credible democratic and justice institutions is one thing (and Rwanda has them), but applying laws correctly and consistently, is a continuous exercise for all countries, regardless of how modern and progressive they are.

As a matter of fact, in the last decade and a half, terrorism and the new kind of world threats have put democratic systems to the “stress test” in the most developed nations. And some of the results were mixed, to say the least.

So of course, there’s always room for progress and Rwanda is no exception to that rule. However, more to the point of the article, what is important is not to confuse genuine appeals for improvement and progress in applications of laws etc., and agenda-driven ones.

Appeals that come in the form of calls for “dialogue about the problems Rwanda faces” actually mean “join us in opposing current Rwandan leaders and politics”.

Granted, the internet video appeal mentioned conceals its intentions poorly, but as wisely said, not everyone is aware of a few groups’ on-going efforts to discredit Rwanda.

Therefore, to write and sensitise readers or web-surfers about the devious nature of these tactics, is a good decision.

Diyana, Rwanda

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I agree with this article; many things were realised in Rwanda for a good future for Rwandans, especially the youth. Youth have to add their work at this and continuing to dream bigger; it is important to know that all this comes with hard work and patience. Good and refined accomplishments need time.

We should encourage the youth to listen to their leaders and bring their constructive ideas to bear to continue the path of building a democratic nation where peace and freedom prevail.

Benjamin Nshimiyimana, France

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