Brazil left reeling after humiliation, Klose breaks record

THERE WAS ANGER, disbelief and a feeling of betrayal as well as sporadic violent protests in several parts of the country after the 2014 Fifa World Cup hosts Brazil suffered their worst defeat in history.

THERE WAS ANGER, disbelief and a feeling of betrayal as well as sporadic violent protests in several parts of the country after the 2014 Fifa World Cup hosts Brazil suffered their worst defeat in history.

Prior to Tuesday’s massacre, Brazil hadn’t lost a competitive match on home soil since 1975, while their worst defeat in any competition was a 6-0 against Uruguay 1920 at the South American Championships.

The home of football as Brazil is referred to in other parts of the world, is not associated with such humiliating defeats, and it could take forever for the 7-1 reverse to sink in their minds but history will forever have it that way. 

It’s a defeat they will never forget, let alone comprehend regardless of whether they change the coaches, or even the entire team. But for the start, Brazilians want to see the back of Luiz Felipe Scolari, as to most, he doesn’t know what he is doing.

They know the result is irreversible and they will have to live with it just like they will have to accept that hosting the World Cup is no guarantee to win the tournament--for Brazil, its now two finals tournament at home and no returns to show for on occasions, 1950 and 2014.

“The man is out of depth and too negative to be coach of Brazil, he needs to go immediately, we don’t need him anymore, enough is enough,” said one angry fan, Vitor Ortega.

His sentiments are shared by millions of Brazilians, who are not happy that their team, which used to be admired world over for their attacking style of play, is now seen as a more defensive side.

To some Brazilians, the last couple of days have been the toughest they have had to contend with in a long time.

First the loss of their star player and poster boy Neymar, who suffered a broken vertebra during the quarterfinal clash against Colombia and will be out of action for a considerable period, and now the worst defeat in their team’s history.

“This is probably the worst period to be a Brazilian, first we lose Neymar and as if that is not enough, we lose to Germany in a such manner, it so terrible, we are feeling bad and I don’t want to blame one person for this defeat, the whole team must take blame,” another fan, Maria, a mother of two, noted. 

It was a terrible day for Brazil football; they had never seen anything like this. To concede five goals in the opening 30 minutes was the worst possible nightmare they could have thought of.

Scolari’s team was outplayed by the Germans to a degree that the home fans booed them as they went into the half time break and in the second period, they started to cheer every pass by the opposition--so bad it was and it simply expounded the humiliation the team was already suffering.

Germany started the day as favourites but to be 3-0 in less than 20 minutes was not what they expected and Brazil never recovered, they (Germans) simply took full advantage--they could or should have scored even more, that’s how dominant they were.

It was double delight for the Germans as striker Miloslav Klose netted his 16th world cup finals goal to break the record held by Brazilian legend Ronaldo, who is working as commentator for local television, Global.

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