Who is keeping FDLR on life support?

Last week, African nations meeting in Angola decided to give another chance to the Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda (FDLR) militia.

Last week, African nations meeting in Angola decided to give another chance to the Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda (FDLR) militia.

The militia operating in eastern DR Congo, were given a six-month ultimatum to lay down arms voluntarily or face a forceful disarmament.

The very fact that FDLR is still in existence is still an enigma. Many UN resolutions calling for their forceful disarmament have never been enforced as the militia continues to freely roam in the jungles of DRC causing mayhem and destruction.

This is the group that is responsible for the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi, which left over one million people dead.

If the 20,000 strong UN force in DRC could go after and defeat the M23 rebels in less than a month, what is so difficult to apply the same robust mandate and forcefully go after FDLR?

Instead, the UN force has become a sympathiser for the rebel outfit and its leaders.

For example just last week, the UN head of peace keeping operations attempted to sneak out FDLR leader, Victor Byiringiro, to travel to Europe.

Despite Byingiro being the subject of UN sanctions, Herve Ladsous saw it fit to try to lift a travel ban imposed against Byiringio. He even airlifted the FDLR leader from eastern DRC to Kinshasa.

If the UN and the DRC governments can have direct access to the head of a terrorist organisation, why can’t they neutralise him instead of playing host?

As long as FDLR continues to enjoy support in the corridors of the UN and some Capitals, peace in DRC will remain a pipe dream.

If after six months, the FDRL don’t disarm, African nations should find the answer to this enigma?  The UN has failed.