MPs briefed on Vision 2020

The Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning yesterday presented focal points government seeks to drive to achieve targets for the ambitious Vision 2020 agenda. 
Rwamuganza (R) outlines the revisions to Mukayuhi. Timothy Kisambira.
Rwamuganza (R) outlines the revisions to Mukayuhi. Timothy Kisambira.

The Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning yesterday presented focal points government seeks to drive to achieve targets for the ambitious Vision 2020 agenda. 

Vision 2020  is an ambitious plan to make Rwanda a middle income economy. 

Presenting the roadmap to members of the parliamentary Budget Committee, the director-general of Budget at the Ministry of Finance, Caleb Rwamuganza, recalled that the blueprint was revised three years ago, and highlighted essence of accountability and good planning. 

“Plans should be guided by a clear strategy with focused targets and coordinated well to avoid duplication or gaps,” Rwamuganza said, adding that unrealistic visions should not be pursued without consideration of economic feasibility. 

Targets that were revised include increasing agricultural production from 5.8 per cent to 8.5 per cent, industrial growth from 8.8 per cent to 14 per cent, export growth from 19 per cent to 28 per cent and curbing population growth from 2.9 per cent to 2.2 per cent. 

A 2011 report indicated that of 44 targets of Vision 2020, 66 per cent were on track, 11 per cent were achievable, while 22 per cent were off track. 

The areas identified as off track were mainly population, poverty reduction and environment protection. 

Delay in funds release

Areas where strong achievements were made include reduction of infant mortality rate, increase in secondary and tertiary school enrolment, reduction in malaria-related deaths and reduction of HIV/Aids prevalence. 

However, despite the achievements, some targets remain far above reality. 

For example, the current access to electricity lies at 10.8 per cent (the average for low and medium income countries is 67 per cent, while government plans to connect 70 per cent of the population to electricity by 2020. 

MP Constance Mukayuhi, the chairperson of the Budget Committee, said delays in disbursing project funds and lack of qualified personnel could hamper the achievement of the targets. 

“Some ministries and government agencies delay to commit funds. Sometimes they partially release or release no funds to districts altogether, thereby causing accumulation of arrears or delays in projects,” Mukayuhi said. 

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