Trade ministry moves to promote consumer rights

Law enforcement officers and selected members of the private sector and civil society groups have been trained in consumer rights and fair competition in business. 
A facilitator addresses participants during the workshop last week. Didace Ndamira.
A facilitator addresses participants during the workshop last week. Didace Ndamira.

Law enforcement officers and selected members of the private sector and civil society groups have been trained in consumer rights and fair competition in business. 

The World Bank-supported training, organised by the Ministry of Trade and Industry, was also attended by districts officials. 

It focused on the importance of enforcing the competition law, the scope of the law,  basic concepts in competition economics and protecting consumer rights, according to Clairette Ngabo, the director of the National Consumer Inspection and Competition Authority. 

“The workshop was aimed at sensitising stakeholders on the importance of safeguarding consumers’ safety, and is mainly targeting the private sector, public servants and civil society groups to ensure an inclusive effort to protect consumers,’’ Ngabo said.

Rwanda’s consumer protection law was enacted in 2012 to promote healthy competition in the country’s private sector and ensure consumer safety.

Emmanuel Hategeka, the Ministry of Trade and Industry permanent secretary, noted that competition laws and policies are the cornerstone of modern economies. 

He added that such laws attract investment and improve private sector competitiveness,  innovation and, eventually, enhance private sector productivity,  which are key to sustainable economic growth. 

Tania Bengazo, competition specialist at the World Bank, Joyce Karanja, from Coulson Associates, and Francis Kariuki, the director general of Competition Authority of Kenya were among the facilitators of the training.

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