Customer service has improved but 70% satisfaction rating questionable

Editor, I appreciate the fact that the Government of Rwanda realised that we can’t reach our development targets without good customer care.

Editor,

I appreciate the fact that the Government of Rwanda realised that we can’t reach our development targets without good customer care.

According to your article (Has our customer service improved? – The New Times, October 9), customer satisfaction in the country stands at 70 per cent. Is this really true? I am quite skeptical about this figure. My doubts are based on what I see in most institutions, mainly hospitals, banks, hotels and restaurants.

It’s true that there has been some improvement over the last few years, but I don’t think it true that the level of satisfaction has reached 70 per cent (and the target is 80 per cent). I am wondering whether the research referred to in the article was really scientific.

There are certain practices which I feel greatly undermine customer service, which institutions such as the Rwanda Development Board (RDB) should try to address.

They include officers getting busy on their cell phones while on duty yet there are long queues of customers waiting to be served; too much gossiping among the staff on duty at the time they should be providing a serve to someone; getting busy on Facebook, Tweeter, among other social media platforms; working at terribly slow pace to mention but few.

I am saying this because all these practices are forbidden in many developed countries.  During working hours, people are expected to do their job accordingly and be result-oriented.

Maybe RDB should consider coming up with a code of conduct that should govern employees during working hours, and have it applied in every institution – be it private or public – and devise enforcement measures.

Abby, Kigali

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