Will there be justice for Genocide victims?

THE FATE of five Genocide suspects living in the United Kingdom will be known next month. Four of the suspects escaped British justice about six years ago through technicalities and there is no guarantee that this time it will be any different.

THE FATE of five Genocide suspects living in the United Kingdom will be known next month. Four of the suspects escaped British justice about six years ago through technicalities and there is no guarantee that this time it will be any different.

Hundreds of Genocide suspects are living freely across the world, especially in Europe and North America. Some of the most notorious are subject to Interpol red notices but their host countries are not bothered, and that is the most worrying factor.

Many countries only pay lip service in the fight against genocide and crimes against humanity, and when it comes to practically doing something about it, they are conspicuously absent. They would rather bankroll the bottomless pit that is the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) than getting their hands dirty.

The Genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda has become so banalised in some western countries that will arrest or extradite terror suspects at the blink of an eye than bring to justice those responsible for the deaths of more than a million Rwandans.

Not doing anything and letting Genocide suspects walk free is tantamount to giving them a blanket amnesty. The so-called human rights organisations that are always ready to point an accusing finger are suspiciously mute when it comes to arresting Genocide suspects, many of whom do not even bother to keep a low profile.

The fight against Genocide denial should be taken to another level, depending on the goodwill of countries playing hosts to suspects is not enough; the reality of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi should be continuously drummed in the world’s conscience otherwise it risks being branded as a myth.

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