Stay focused on doing the right things and ignore lesson-givers

Editor,This is with reference to Pan Butamire’s article, “Second-hand democracy for Africa?” published in The New Times edition of August 9.
Farmers pick tea during a previous harvest. Net photo.
Farmers pick tea during a previous harvest. Net photo.

Editor,

This is with reference to Pan Butamire’s article, “Second-hand democracy for Africa?” published in The New Times edition of August 9.

The West’s issue with Rwanda and our government is neither democracy nor really that complicated. Their problem is that you people are too uppity; you have the cheek to talk back instead of taking orders. When you are told to jump you ask why or sometimes say you won’t when the only question you should ask is, ‘boss, how high?’

The democracy thing is pure balderdash; hypocritical dressing that never concerned the West one whit. Look around the world and see the closest chums; see many democrats? Not really, because the consideration by government of its national opinion do tend to get in the way of following orders blindly, even where that may not really be in your people’s interests.

The problem for Rwanda (but we should see it as a blessing) is that we have a government that is only focused on the national interests, and won’t be shaken from working towards that goal. That creates enemies as those who believe we should only be there to serve their interests do not accept maverick leaders who refuse to kowtow sufficiently; leaders moreover who might even set a bad example for others among the lower orders.

We live in a dystopian world where a leader who truly works for their people’s general good is excoriated and where the thoroughly corrupt are considered useful and are, therefore, celebrated.

What we, Rwandans, must do is concentrate on doing what WE know is good for our future; let’s ignore the cacophonous and hypocritical lesson-givers who couldn’t care less for our general welfare and future.

Remember what they did in the wake of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi? You think they ever changed? You think they wouldn’t behave exactly the same way today?

Mwene Kalinda, Kigali

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I think we should always exhibit wisdom in what we speak and what we write. Rwanda is not an island. We live in a world where everybody is looking to everybody. No matter how you behave, there will be always someone living somewhere, to tell you what you did and who you are, judging from what you did and what you said.

If you did well, you will be praised for that, and if you did wrong you will be blamed for that. Therefore, let us show that we are always doing things that someone will praise and avoid things that somebody will curse.

Andrew, Kigali

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