Karongi District youth vow to be role models

YOUTH in Karongi District, Western Province, have committed to lead an exemplary life and fight genocide ideology in order to build a strong and united society.
Manirarora speaks during the dialogue at the weekend.    The New Times/JP Bucyensenge.
Manirarora speaks during the dialogue at the weekend. The New Times/JP Bucyensenge.

YOUTH in Karongi District, Western Province, have committed to lead an exemplary life and fight genocide ideology in order to build a strong and united society.

The pledge was made over the weekend as hundreds of youth delegates convened in the district as part of the ‘Ndi Umunyarwanda’ campaign, according to a statement from the Ministry of Youth and ICT.

‘Ndi Umunyarwanda’ (I am Rwandan) is a platform where Rwandans express themselves to shape the Rwandan society through enhancing the healing process following the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

It was conceived as the best way forward after the recommendations from the first phase of the YouthConnekt Dialogue.

According to the statement, Karongi youth also committed to actively get involved in development activities.

“We pledge to be positive role models and work closely with everyone who wants to contribute in the development of our country,” Francois Nshimiyimana, one of the youth, said.

Embrace programme

Speaking at the function, the Minister for Youth and ICT, Jean Philbert Nsengimana, urged the delegates to embrace ‘Ndi Umunyarwanda’ programme and disseminate its message widely. He called on them to share testimonies of what they saw during the 1994 Genocide against Tutsi in order to relieve their minds.

Anoncee Manirarora, Manager at Karongi Youth Centre, commended ‘Ndi Umunyarwanda’ initiative which she said is a platform that will help promote healing.

‘Ndi Umunyarwanda’ was initiated by Rwandan Youth through Art for Peace with the support of Imbuto Foundation, the Ministry of Youth and ICT among other partners. The dialogue is used as a platform to discuss the country’s history, champion for the truth, seek repentance, forgiveness and strengthen the healing process.

“Ndi Umunyarwanda helps us to understand our roots as Rwandans and highlights the origins and meanings of  ethinicities and clans, during the time of our ancestors and how it got distorted during colonialism and led to the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi,” a programme statement reads in part.

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