New CHUK centre to enhance medical practice

The National University of Rwanda (NUR) has opened a simulation and skills centre to ensure patients’ safety and effective clinical care through experiential learning and education in technical and non-technical skills for health providers.
Medics inspect the new facility at CHUK during the official launch yesterday.  Courtesy photo.
Medics inspect the new facility at CHUK during the official launch yesterday. Courtesy photo.

The National University of Rwanda (NUR) has opened a simulation and skills centre to ensure patients’ safety and effective clinical care through experiential learning and education in technical and non-technical skills for health providers.

The centre, located at Central Teaching Hospital, Kigali (CHUK), is affiliated to the university’s faculty of medicine.

It will enable medical students use ‘dummy patients’ for practical lessons before they start practicing.

Dr George Ntakiyiruta, the director of Faculty of Medicine and the head of the centre, said it is not only their moral duty but also in their interest to impart medical knowledge and technical and non-technical skills to those who want to become health professionals.

“It has always been our priority to ensure patients’ rights are served to the letter as technology advances. The way we were trained during our days is no longer acceptable,” said Dr Ntakiyiruta.

He said the goal of the centre is to create a learning environment where trainee medics can acquire skills ranging from simple clinical procedures to team management of complex emergency scenarios.

Despite officially opening yesterday, officials said the centre started operations in February, and has since trained more than 500 professionals.

Increasing demand

According to Dr Ntakiyiruta, the demand for the services of the centre has been on the increase since it was opened.

Prof. Patrick Kyamanywa, the NUR Faculty of Medicine dean, said this is a “very exciting moment” not only for the faculty but also to the patients since they will have more confidence in the quality of doctors produced by the national university.

“We do simulation because we don’t want students to practice on patients. Learning is stimulated by practice, it is important to give students hands on experience than lecture sermons,” Prof. Kyamanywa said.

The centre was established in partnership with Canadian anesthesiologists’ society and, according to officials, this partnership has raised awareness of the challenges of effective medical teaching with limited resources.

Subscribe to The New Times E-Paper


You want to chat directly with us? Send us a message on WhatsApp at +250 788 310 999    

 

Follow The New Times on Google News