Farmers in Kayonza look to high yields

Farmers in Murundi Sector, Kayonza District, are optimistic of high crop yields after embracing use of composed manure on their farmland this planting season.
Local leaders engage farmers in use of manure gardens. The New Times/ S. Rwembeho.
Local leaders engage farmers in use of manure gardens. The New Times/ S. Rwembeho.

Farmers in Murundi Sector, Kayonza District, are optimistic of high crop yields after embracing use of composed manure on their farmland this planting season.

The farmers were speaking on the sidelines of Saturday’s community work (Umuganda) in Murundi. The Umuganda at the sector attracted legislatures and the Governor of Eastern Province, Odette Uwamariya.

Speaking at a meeting held after the communal work, Edouard Ndahayo, an area farmer, said there had been change in attitude toward the use of manure, saying production would be high in the first half of the 2014 season.

Drought

Ndahayo added that farmers were earning a lot of money from selling organic manure, to their colleagues in different parts of the country.

“I earn Rwf400,000 on average from every manure pit I prepare. The money helps me to pay labourers and other inputs I need and get surplus for my farm which makes me optimistic of high yield at the end of the season,” Ndahayo said.

Most sectors in Kayonza District are drought-prone and have poor soils, which require use of manure and inorganic fertilisers.

Francois Byabarumwanzi, one of the 15 MPs who attended the function, applauded the farmers’ initiative to prepare manure for their crops.

“It is important that farmers take the initiative to increase crop productivity. At the end of the day the benefits go to them. Use of fertilisers should be a culture of every Rwandan,” he said.

Use of fertilisers in Kayonza district is still at 11.2 per cent and, like other districts, has started a campaign to increase use fertilisers on farmland.

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