Study links diabetes to disability

Diabetes increases the risk of disabling disorders, including cardiovascular disease, retinopathy, renal failure, and peripheral vascular disease, a new survey reveals.

Diabetes increases the risk of disabling disorders, including cardiovascular disease, retinopathy, renal failure, and peripheral vascular disease, a new survey reveals.

According to the survey, conducted by The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology which reviewed data from thousands of diabetic patients, adults with diabetes have a higher risk of physical disability.

 

Older people with diabetes, the study said, are 50 per cent to 80 per cent more likely to develop a physical disability than those without, based on a review of 26 studies.

 

Diabetic people who may get disabled may find it difficult to perform usual activities such as eating, bathing, among other activities.

 

Complications caused by high blood glucose levels, such as amputation, blindness, heart disease and stroke were themselves major causes of disability.

According to Crispin Gishoma, the Coordinator of the Rwanda Diabetes Association, every nine seconds worldwide, someone is getting amputated due to diabetes.

He noted that it’s indeed true that diabetes increases risk of disabilities, though this can be controlled.

“We do have some cases as well in Rwanda where diabetic people have ended up with disabilities although we are doing all we can to raise awareness and educate Rwandans about this disease. Diabetic people should take their medication as prescribed, exercise and have the right diet and know how to control other associated risks,” he told this paper yesterday.

Gishoma said they are currently raising awareness on diabetes in 32 hospitals countrywide and they intend to reach all health facilities.

Diabetes is a condition in which the body either does not produce enough, or does not properly respond to insulin, a hormone produced in the pancreas.

Over 700 people below the age of 25 years in the country are suffering from diabetes, according to statistics from the Rwanda Diabetes Association.

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