Things I hate about stuck-up Hip-hop artistes

Hip-hop music has been in the country since the early 1980s and one of its pioneers was Abdul Aziz Nsabimana, aka DJ Berry, famous for his song, "Hey You."

Hip-hop music has been in the country since the early 1980s and one of its pioneers was Abdul Aziz Nsabimana, aka DJ Berry, famous for his song, "Hey You."

Today, many artistes and groups have emerged, bridging the gap between Kinyarwanda and foreign languages like Swahili, English and French to ensure that both audiences are entertained and informed.

 

Riderman, Ama G The Black, Jay Polly and his Tuff Gang crew, Diplomate, Danny Nanone, Green P, Paccy and Young Grace are currently among popular Hip-hop artistes in the country.

 

But, that’s not our focus today, perhaps a subject for another day. There are a number of ways how creativity nowadays has hit a dead-end. Maybe it is the new trend or the musicians lack inspiration owing to the fact that some of them are stuck-up fellas desperate for fame or simply trying to make a living from music.

 

Here are some of the ways Hip-hop musicians try to catch our attention.

They pretend they are filthy rich

Most lyrics in Hip-hop today are shallow. They draw their inspiration from artistes who try to tell us how they spend their money. 

Okay, let’s pretend you’re called Young Cash and your latest track goes like this: Born in da ghetto, born out of wedlock, I am running a studio in Nyamirambo since back in the days and I’ve been collecting my fee, smoke some crappy stuff with my homies in the hood.

It seems to me that Hip-hop music in Rwanda is on its deathbed because these musicians don’t seem to get it right. You know it was cool when they released their first singles about being filthy rich but now it’s no longer cool at all. There are many ways how they can get inspiration for their lyrics.

How do you justify making a career about driving borrowed cars and if they’re that rich, how come most of them don’t own cars, hanging out in cheap places and live a poor lifestyle.

Kick it old skool

There is this sour love affair between Hip-hop and the dark world of gangs, drugs and gang related violence and some of these artistes seem to encourage it through their songs. And it seems as though that the only way to be relevant to the Hip-hop music scene is to become a hooligan, notorious, have links to the mafias or a pimp.

Honestly, it’s not exciting to tell us how bad you’re. I was listening to Rick Ross’ song, “Push it to the limit” the other day, where he brags about being a drug peddler. 

It’s no longer the jam. In any case, Rick should have known better that such a song could be an exhibit. It’s like some nerdy guy back in high school, whose pickup lines have gone stale.

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