Unity crucial in fighting genocide ideology­ – mayor

Rwandans have been called upon to embrace unity and reconciliation so as to fight any form of genocide ideology.
Mourners from Nyarugenge district observe the candle night ceremony in honour of the victims of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi. The New Times/ T. Kisambira.
Mourners from Nyarugenge district observe the candle night ceremony in honour of the victims of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi. The New Times/ T. Kisambira.

Rwandans have been called upon to embrace unity and reconciliation so as to fight any form of genocide ideology.

The Mayor of Nyarugenge district, Solange Mukamusoni, said coming together, especially at this moment of Genocide commemoration, will help the population to have a common understanding of the past so as to focus on a brighter future.

“What happened in this country 19 years a go left many issues and teaches us many lessons which we can never accept our children to go through given the negative impacts it left behind; and the easiest way to ensure that it never happens again is to come together and reflect on what happened,” she said.

The mayor was addressing residents of the district and other members of the public who turned up for the district commemoration event at Nyamirambo stadium.

She emphasised the need for the population to continue working towards a common goal for the development of the country.

The speech was preceded by a Walk to Remember ceremony that started from St Andrew’s Church in Nyamirambo to the stadium.

Mukamusoni told the mourners that commemorating the Genocide should be perceived with it rightful intention and meaning of enabling the population, especially the youth, to learn and know what the country went through so as to further strengthen and develop strategies to avoid repeat of the tragedy.

An official with umbrella body of Genocide survivors (Ibuka), Gilbert Masengo, said there is still need for genocide education.

He said although there are some people who deny what happened, the most important issue is how Rwandans come up with a strong Never Again mechanism.

“It is us Rwandans who know what actually happened to us and it cost in terms of human capital thereby affecting national development; we are, therefore, in the right position to tell our own story than any other person,” he said.

The event attracted many from various private and public institutions.

The Director-General at Ministry of Local Government, Egide Rugamba, said despite the effects of the genocide, what the country has so far attained gives hope for a far brighter future.

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