President joins youth in Walk To Remember

President Paul Kagame, yesterday, joined thousands of youth in the Walk To Remember, a march organised by Rwandan youth to pay tribute to the over a million people who perished in the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.
President Kagame (in dark-blue blazer) holds a youth during the Walk To Remember in Kigali yesterday.   The New Times/ Village Urugwiro.
President Kagame (in dark-blue blazer) holds a youth during the Walk To Remember in Kigali yesterday. The New Times/ Village Urugwiro.

President Paul Kagame, yesterday, joined thousands of youth in the Walk To Remember, a march organised by Rwandan youth to pay tribute to the over a million people who perished in the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

Dressed in black sports attire, the President was joined by several youth, Cabinet ministers, Members of Parliament and other senior government officials in the walk.

The march, which started from Parliament in Kimihurura and ended at Amahoro National Stadium, lasted about 30 minutes. On arrival at the stadium, President Kagame lit the candles of hope in memory of the victims.

The youth formed circles of the famous ‘hope flames’ in the stadium as the night vigil began. The vigil is based on Rwanda’s tradition of mourning where the community gather to remember their loved ones.

During the event, youth from Peace and Love Proclaimers (PLP) organisation held a ‘Name Reading’ of about 100 people victims.

The names represent the 100 dark days of the Genocide and each name represents 10,000 people killed in the tragedy.

The president of Ibuka, Dr Jean Pierre Dusingizemungu, said the mourning period is a trying moment for Rwanda and commended the government for the progress made in supporting Genocide survivors.

“When we met here last year, I highlighted some of the challenges that survivors face, including medical care for those with special conditions, shelter and education, among others,” said Dusingizemungu. “I am happy to say that much of what we asked for, we got it.”

He said of the 18,000 survivors who had special medical conditions that needed referral abroad, 12,000 have been attended to.

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