Reliving life through Art and photography at Kwetu

A month long picturesque and art exhibition is on show at the Kwetu Film Institute in Gacuriro. The showcase, running under the theme “Images of Memory” opened last Friday and runs till April 29th. Works on display are characterised by various artistic skills and a sense of distinctive beauty. There is also a huge assortment of artistic styles and techniques that are also presented at the exhibition.
Bringing back the memories through art.
Bringing back the memories through art.

A month long picturesque and art exhibition is on show at the Kwetu Film Institute in Gacuriro.

The showcase, running under the theme “Images of Memory” opened last Friday and runs till April 29th. Works on display are characterised by various artistic skills and a sense of distinctive beauty. There is also a huge assortment of artistic styles and techniques that are also presented at the exhibition.

Around 20 photographs taken by local photographers and others from Denmark and Belgium are on display. On the other hand, the 65 paintings depicting the dark and bright face of the country are a great attraction to visitors.

Quevine Kagirimpundu, the curator of the studios said the theme was chosen because they wanted to tell the history of Rwanda from as far back to what and where it is now.

“We wanted these images to pass on the message of unity and reconciliation not in regard to Rwanda only but also the rest of the world. That is because we expected different people from different countries to see the art.”

Kagirimpundu argues that art is a therapy for the soul. She argues that people don’t buy art because they want to but because there is a story in the piece that they relate to.

She said, “If you see someone looking at the art piece more than once, that means it has touched them in one way or another.”

As part of the theme, 20-year-old Benjamin Mwizerwa, one of the exhibitors, explains his drawing of the mountain gorillas in Rwanda, one of the tourism attractions in the country.

He says he is thankful that he had the chance to showcase his paintings because he believes it is through exhibition that many people will appreciate his work. “It is also good for my exposure as an artist,” he added.

The art displayed included paintings, sculptures, photographs and installation. These art pieces will stay on show for a month and the curator says people can always look and buy them whenever they want.

The art pieces cost between US$30- US$1000.

The exhibition, held courtesy of Uburanga Arts Studio, features images that are conserved in paintings, sculptures and photographs. The paintings are made using acrylic and other materials used to make sculptures. 

According to the organisers, ten percent of the proceedings from the exhibition will be given to Gisimba Memorial Centre, which looks after people affected by the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

As she smiles, Kagirimpundu says she was not disappointed with the turn up on March 29th, although she admits that she did not expect it at the opening night.

To her, this shows there is light at the end of the tunnel for art in the country.

The exhibition opens everyday from morning to evening.

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