Journalists advised on Genocide memorial reporting

Officials from the National Commission for the fight against Genocide (CNLG) have urged media practitioners in the country to be more sensitive in their reporting during 19th commemoration of the Genocide against the Tutsi.

Officials from the National Commission for the fight against Genocide (CNLG) have urged media practitioners in the country to be more sensitive in their reporting during 19th commemoration of the Genocide against the Tutsi. This, according to CNLG is aimed at helping to further reconciliation.

The officials were Tuesday addressing media practitioners ahead of the April 7-13 commemoration week.

The media was also cautioned against giving genocide deniers platform.

“You should know the message Rwandans need in that period, messages that do not cause traume,” Ildephonse Kabengera, the director in charge of commemoration activities at CNLG said.

Jean de Dieu Mucyo, CNLG Executive Secretary, urged all Rwandans, especially  the youth to embrace the commemoration.

The Media High Council, as a part of organisers, appreciated the role the media played in last years,  according to the assessment done  to discern the role played by the media in informing the public during the commemoration period.

An in-depth analysis of the news and current affairs programmes reveals that media organs were accurate, balanced and sufficiently sourced at 91.15 per cent 95.44 per cent and 97.44 per cent respectively.

Twenty-three radio shows, 10 new papers and eight websites were assessed.

According to Eric Bazirema, the acting director of regulation and licensing at the Media High Council, journalists should use constructive expressions through critical thinking and  avoid bias, exaggeration and trivialisation.

 The 19th Genocide commemoration will be marked under the theme: “Let’s remember the Genocide against the Tutsi while striving for self –reliance.”

Subscribe to The New Times E-Paper


You want to chat directly with us? Send us a message on WhatsApp at +250 788 310 999    

 

Follow The New Times on Google News