It is not the students’ fault to be unaware of rules

Editor,This is in reference to the story, “Classes for A’ level private candidates suspended (The New Times, February 25).
Students in a classroom:  It is important for Rwanda Education Board to investigate leaking exams as well.The New Times / File.
Students in a classroom: It is important for Rwanda Education Board to investigate leaking exams as well.The New Times / File.

Editor,

This is in reference to the story, “Classes for A’ level private candidates suspended (The New Times, February 25).

Cheating is one thing. But not knowing the requirements due to teachers and directors not knowing them is not the fault of the students. First, most of these students don’t have direct channels from where to know rules and regulations.

Second, they trusted their teachers and directors.

Third, these students should be given their scores and certificates if they passed and then next year, make it totally clear so that every school understands the requirements.

Fourth, disseminating information that is this important should be given the highest level of attention in making sure everyone knows the rules prior to students starting their studies. This would enable them to make a wise and correct decision about their future.

Rwanda’s youth are the future and to discourage and dismantle their dreams this way is a sad state of affairs. Please make this right for students who have worked hard, sacrificed much in time, money and energy and who deserve to be treated fairly. It is the right thing to do.

Margie Krogh, Kagugu, Kigali
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Editor,

I think this is the best move. I personally know of a case of a student who jumped from Senior Five directly to Senior Six as a private candidate.

I wondered what the point of secondary education was at all. I think the issue is that of policy. Let the Ministry of Education devise a clear policy to stop this and other loopholes.

It is also important for the Rwanda Education Board to investigate the leaking of exams. I once met a candidate who told me she came across a physics paper in 2011 that students were revising as they awaited the exam to begin and this turned out to be the actual exam.

I am told that teachers who set exams allegedly collude to leak them and sell them to candidates with the going rate set at Rwf80,000 per paper.

Rwanda is renowned for its tough stance on corruption, but if we don’t address such issues in our education system, the consequences are enormous.

Concerned Parent, Remera, Kigali

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