Twelve doctors trained to steer cervical cancer fight

A team of 12 doctors drawn from various referral and district hospitals countrywide, last week, completed a training programme on modern and more efficient methods of detecting and treating cervical cancer.
Dr Ntirushwa tries out the cancer magnifying device. The New Times/ Sam K. Nkurunziza.
Dr Ntirushwa tries out the cancer magnifying device. The New Times/ Sam K. Nkurunziza.

A team of 12 doctors drawn from various referral and district hospitals countrywide, last week, completed a training programme on modern and more efficient methods of detecting and treating cervical cancer.

The training was conducted at Butaro Hospital in Burera district, where there is a cancer centre of excellence that offers a spectrum of diagnostic and treatment services.

It was organised by Partners in Health in collaboration with the Rwanda Biomedical Centre (RBC) and conducted by volunteer physicians from the US.

The dooctors were trained in electro-surgical excision procedures with use of special magnifying devices, which enable medics to swiftly examine and diagnose cancer of the cervix.

Free screening

At the climax of the training, the doctors conducted free cervical cancer screening and treatment to more than 100 women at Ruhengeri Hospital.

“This is a crucial means of early detection because it enables one to prevent the cancer once you conduct regular screening,” Dr David Ntirushwa from the University Teaching Hospital of Kigali said.

Citing the successful vaccination to girls countrywide as a preventive measure, Dr Ntirushwa expressed optimism regarding the acquired skills in modern methods of treating women.

Jacklin Saint-Fleur, an official in charge of the Womens’ Health department at PIH, said this highlights impressive strides made by Rwanda in cancer care.

“It is in line with the national plan of eliminating cancer for which we are proud to support,” he said.

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