Girls excel in PLE

Girls have performed exceptionally well compared to boys in the Primary Leaving Examinations (PLE) results that were released, yesterday. Among the 10 best candidates in the country, six of them are girls.

Girls have performed exceptionally well compared to boys in the Primary Leaving Examinations (PLE) results that were released, yesterday.

Among the 10 best candidates in the country, six of them are girls.

Overall, 53.74 percent girls and 46.26 percent boys passed, but only 41.9 percent girls passed in division 1, compared to 58.09 percent for boys.

According to the State Minister in charge of Primary and Secondary Education, Dr Mathias Harebamungu, there was a general improvement in the pass rate of girls in division 1 – from 38.44 percent in 2010.

The best performing girls are Nancy Mutoni, Sonia Erika Niyibizi (Kigali Parents), Belise Kayonga, Alice Uwiringiyimana, Mary Umwali Munyagatanga, all from New Life Academy (Kayonza), and Marie Michelle Ishimwe of Apaper.

New Life Academy, Les Gazelles, Saint Ignace and Kigali Parents were among the best performing schools in the country.

Compared to 2010, the overall performance in 2011, is slightly better. 82.75 percent candidates passed compared to 82.64 percent in 2010.

“Now that we have introduced the 12-Year-Basic-Education programme, the number of students who sit for exams will also grow bigger, and we shall take measures to ensure improvement in overall performance,” said Harebamungu.

He added that the adoption of English as the official language of instruction had not affected performance.

The percentage of candidates who registered and sat for the primary leaving exams increased from 89.21 percent in 2010 to 93.32 percent in 2011. Of the total candidates, 54.47 percent were girls.

Most rural based schools recorded better performance last year compared to the previous years, the minister concluded.

maria.kaitesi@newtimes.co.rw

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