Technical schools acquire modern teaching software

Technical schools in the country are set to undergo change in teaching following the introduction of modern designing software, known as Solid Works.  The software was handed over to Workforce Development Authority (WDA) yesterday and it will initially be taught in four pilot schools and Integrated Technological Colleges with effect from January 2011.
L-R; Solidworks Vice President David Stott, Eng. Diogene Mulindahabi and the Director of ICT in WDA David Mugume looking at the software. The New Times / John Mbanda.
L-R; Solidworks Vice President David Stott, Eng. Diogene Mulindahabi and the Director of ICT in WDA David Mugume looking at the software. The New Times / John Mbanda.

Technical schools in the country are set to undergo change in teaching following the introduction of modern designing software, known as Solid Works.

The software was handed over to Workforce Development Authority (WDA) yesterday and it will initially be taught in four pilot schools and Integrated Technological Colleges with effect from January 2011.

The arrangement to rollout the software was made in collaboration with the government of Ireland and Solid Works, an American company which developed the software.

Speaking to The New Times, the Director of Research and Development Unit in the Education Ministry, Remy Twiringiyimana, said , the software will help students , become more creative and boost innovation among technical students.

“You can sketch any product that comes to your mind and then integrate it into the software and come up with a product that you have developed yourself,” said Twiringiyimana.

He added that it can be used to improve the already existing products and structures by making them better.

According to Twiringiyimana, four technical tutors were sent to Ireland to learn how the software operates and they are now training 22 other teachers who will be teaching the software to students come January.

He explained that they had also adopted the Ireland technical curriculum otherwise known as T4, and tried to tailor it to fit into the Rwandan context.

In her address at the launch of the software, the Director General for Science, Technology and Research in the ministry, Dr. Christine Gasingirwa, urged the tutors to use the knowledge they have acquired to enhance innovation among their students.

“I look forward to see the software creating a mass of critical thinking among young people who are able to create their own jobs,” she said.modern teaching software

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