Dev’t partners pledge more support

Despite the global economic situation, including the Euro zone debt crisis and fiscal situation in the United States, Rwanda is assured of aid flow because of its effective utilisation of budgetary support.The assurance comes after development partners changed the approach on aid to a result-based approach, with Rwanda, among the few countries, recognised for its successful approach on aid effectiveness

Despite the global economic situation, including the Euro zone debt crisis and fiscal situation in the United States, Rwanda is assured of aid flow because of its effective utilisation of budgetary support.

The assurance comes after development partners changed the approach on aid to a result-based approach, with Rwanda, among the few countries, recognised for its successful approach on aid effectiveness.

This was mentioned during the 14th Joint Budget Support Review where the government and development partners met to review the budget execution performance and sectoral performance against Economic Development and Poverty Reduction Strategy (EDPRS) strategic outcomes for the financial year 2010/11.

Development Partners were impressed with the performance, but urged the government to focus on service delivery both in public and private institutions.

Briefing journalists about the review, Finance Minister John Rwangombwa, observed that aid would have a very big impact.

“The results we are achieving in terms of development are good, and it’s linked with the dialogue and quality partnership we have with our development partners,” he said, adding that government does not take its partners for granted.

He promised to continue working closely with the partners to remove all bottlenecks that delay various programmes, pointing out that they could end up as leakages of some resources and not serve the intended purpose.

Negatu Makonnen, the African Development Bank Resident Representative, who also co-chairs the joint budget support review team, said working together will have a great impact on the country’s resources and those put into the economy by development partners.

“The whole process is owned by the government, this is an exemplary model,” said Makonnen said.

Recently, the World Bank Vice President for Africa, Obiageli Ezekwesili, warned rich countries against considering cuts to development assistance after the International Monetary Fund (IMF) cut its 2011 and 2012 global growth forecast to four percent.

Development partners acknowledged that the concern of rich countries to cut aid is real, noting that it would have to be result-based.

Ends

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