Anyone would wish to be part of the new Rwanda – Rwigema

Former Prime Minister, Pierre Celestin Rwigema, yesterday said that anyone following Rwanda’s remarkable transformation process would wish to be part of it, hence his motivation to return. Rwigema made the remarks while addressing a news conference following his return to Rwanda, on Saturday, after 11 years in exile.
 Pierre Celestin Rwigema addresses a news conference in Kigali yesterday. The New Times/John Mbanda.
Pierre Celestin Rwigema addresses a news conference in Kigali yesterday. The New Times/John Mbanda.

Former Prime Minister, Pierre Celestin Rwigema, yesterday said that anyone following Rwanda’s remarkable transformation process would wish to be part of it, hence his motivation to return.

Rwigema made the remarks while addressing a news conference following his return to Rwanda, on Saturday, after 11 years in exile.

“Anyone following Rwanda’s evolution would wish to be part of it. This is why I chose to come back and be part of the good cause,” the former premier said, adding that he is back to participate in the ongoing development of the country.

“In some challenging situations, we are often asked to think correctly and think big, this is why I took the decision to come back.

“Seeing what has been done in Rwanda, President Kagame’s efforts deserve our support and I am ready to support him and keep building this country the way he is doing and serve the people of this country, who have gone past trivial issues like ethnic sentiments,” he said.

Rwigema, whose smear campaign against the government featured on various news outlets, said he was misinformed and asked for pardon.

“I know some people are still angry with me because of the language I used, but I apologise. I discovered that it was some few people who wanted to bring me down,” said Rwigema, who sought political asylum in the US in 2000.

He added that; “…the problem is not making a mistake, the problem is not admitting a mistake. I admit my errors and apologise”.

Rwigema pointed out that his return to Rwanda was a personal decision. 

“Upon arrival, I was highly welcomed home and I thank the President for efforts to ensure I arrived home safely,” he said, adding that he immediately toured the city and was impressed by the way the country had changed in the last 11 years.

“From what I have seen, I thank the President and the people of Rwanda for the great work done. Rwanda has turned into a global reference of a well-led and developing country,” he said.

Rwigema blamed his fleeing on members of the Democratic Republican Movement (MDR), a political party he once headed that was later dissolved on grounds of divisionism.

Rwigyema fled the country following a Genocide case against him.

“When I was in exile, I discovered that the accusations against me were not coming from the government but instead from a camp of a few elements within MDR,” he revealed.

The Prosecution suspended the charges against Rwigema citing insufficient evidence.

Speaking to The New Times, the Prosecutor General Martin Ngoga, said his office reviewed the indictments issued against Genocide fugitives and that those that lacked evidence were suspended, including Rwigema’s.

“For the past few years, the National Public Prosecution Authority embarked on a campaign to track down Genocide Fugitives. This was accompanied by a general review of indictments to ensure we process only those that were strongly sustainable in terms of evidence. Those that were found to be wanting, were suspended,” Ngoga said.

“This exercise is continuous and it is in this context that Pierre Celestin Rwigyema’s case file was suspended. As a general rule, the suspension and reopening of cases depends on availability of new evidence,” he said.

Rwigema said that the move proves that the justice system is properly serving the people.

“In case there is new evidence against me, I am ready to appear before court,” he said.

Although Rwigema contends that he does not intend to vie for a political position, he says he is ready and willing to serve if requested.

The former premier told the news conference that Paul Rusesabagina’s portrayal of himself as a “hero”, claiming to have saved the Tutsi at Hotel de Milles Collines, is nothing but fraud motivated by greed and self-interest, shamelessly making money out of the Genocide.

Ends

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