Prosecutors train in interviewing techniques

About 36 crime investigators and prosecutors from various institutions, yesterday, started a course on crime witness interviewing techniques and written statements at the British High Commission in Kigali. The six day-exercise is conducted by experts from the UK Crown Prosecution Service and supported by the British High Commission. The Crown Prosecution Service is a non-ministerial department of the UK Government responsible for public prosecutions of people charged with criminal offences beyond investigation.
Martin Ngoga, the Prosecutor General (R) chats with Ben Llewellyn-Jones, the British High Commissioner at the beginning of the training of investigators. The New Times Timothy Kisambira
Martin Ngoga, the Prosecutor General (R) chats with Ben Llewellyn-Jones, the British High Commissioner at the beginning of the training of investigators. The New Times Timothy Kisambira

About 36 crime investigators and prosecutors from various institutions, yesterday, started a course on crime witness interviewing techniques and written statements at the British High Commission in Kigali.

The six day-exercise is conducted by experts from the UK Crown Prosecution Service and supported by the British High Commission.

The Crown Prosecution Service is a non-ministerial department of the UK Government responsible for public prosecutions of people charged with criminal offences beyond investigation.

Speaking at the opening of the training, Martin Ngoga, the Prosecutor General said that the training is very important for crime investigators to enhance their skills in gathering evidence, intelligence and information.

“I am very grateful to the British High Commissioner for sponsoring the exercise and this is part of strengthening bilateral relations between Rwanda and UK,” he said.

Ngoga mentioned that the training offers a good opportunity for crime investigators to sharpen their intelligence and investigation techniques.

“UK assisted us in setting up the Genocide Fugitive Tracking Unit (GFTU) which is currently doing well and we are happy they are going to strengthen the capacities of our prosecutors and investigators in crime investigation techniques,” he asserted.

Ben Llewellyn-Jones, the British High Commissioner to Rwanda said that the exercise will provide crime investigators with the expertise to conduct standard crime investigations.

“It’s an important course and a credit to the Rwandan government, and we are very happy to support the growth of the justice system in this country,” the envoy said.

The participants were drawn from department of Immigration, Department of Investigations and Customs at the Rwanda Revenue Authority, the BAR association, Interpol department of National Police, judges from the Supreme and High courts and prosecutors.

The trainees will be equipped with skills on how to gather sufficient evidence that could raise a case to set standards.

Speaking to The New Times, Elevanie Mukamuganga, a Prosecutor at GFTU and one of the trainees, stated that the training would furnish her with requisite skills to perform her duties.

“This is a wonderful course that will add a lot of value on the way we are conducting our crime investigations,” she added.

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