Scooper moves to support orphans

Scooper, a Rwandan artiste based in America, has organised a charity concert to support some orphanages in the country.A stellar line-up of artistes will grace the concert today at Petit Stade in Remera.The concert starts at 5:30pm and the entrance fee is Rwf2,500 for the standard seats and Rwf5000 for V.I.P. seats
Scooper (far clad in white) chats with Mpore PEFA orphans.
Scooper (far clad in white) chats with Mpore PEFA orphans.

Scooper, a Rwandan artiste based in America, has organised a charity concert to support some orphanages in the country.

A stellar line-up of artistes will grace the concert today at Petit Stade in Remera.

The concert starts at 5:30pm and the entrance fee is Rwf2,500 for the standard seats and Rwf5000 for V.I.P. seats

Scooper has handpicked the best Rwandan musicians for the concert. Expected to perform include popular Afrobeat star Kitoko, celebrated Hip-hop artiste Jay Polly, radio presenters and multitalented stars Uncle Austin and Kamichi, songstress Knowles, singing sensation Rafiki and Salax Award winning group Dream Boys, and more.

On Wednesday, Scooper visited Mpore-PEFA orphanage in Gikondo – Kigali City, one of the orphanages that will benefit from Scooper Foundation. The star spent some time with the children and also performed for them, alongside Uncle Austin.

The kids entertained their guests by singing different songs,and were grateful for the hope that the stars gave them.

“If everyone could give whatever they could to support the disadvantaged, the world would be a better place,” Scooper said.

“We do not have to be billionaires in order support those in need, but only the heart. Rwandans and volunteers should provide support and health care services to these children,” he noted. 

Mpore PEFA was founded in 1995 by Annonciata Bamurange and her late husband, Jean-Marie Vienne Ngondo. Some of the kids at Mpore PEFA are orphaned by the HIV/AIDS, while many were found dumped and rescued.

Originally, they received support through Ngondo’s connections with local churches, but after his death in 2005, the funding dried up.

Bamurange, 52, told The New Times that the efforts and resources needed to maintain the orphanage have been so substantial for her that she has actually mortgaged her own home to continue the care these children need.

“Such far, we have received a little support from volunteers, some of whom teach the children the importance of artistic passion, like painting and weaving. And we sell the items to get basic needs, like sugar and food, to mention a few,” Bamurange said.

She added: “The Ministry of Gender and Family Promotion also gives us support but only once in a year. Currently, the orphanage houses 40 children, because many others were reunited with their families.”

Like many orphanages in the country, Mpore PEFA needs food, health care, schooling and a stable environment for the children to grow. Without outside assistance these children will not have the opportunities to grow and develop into productive young adults.

However, despite of lack of sufficient support, Bamurange noted that she is more worried about people, who want to take-over the orphanage illegitimately and, she seeks government’s intervention.

“Ever since my husband passed away, I have been facing problems with two men who want to confiscate Mpore PEFA.

We sold our cows and two houses to start this orphanage and now those men want to take it away from me. The case is in court – I am seeking for justice,” Bamurange said.

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