Rwanda’s judicial reforms bearing fruit

A Norwegian appeals court, this week, upheld an earlier ruling by a lower court ordering the extradition of Charles Bandora, one of the key suspects of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.The court ruled that there is no strong evidence to suggest that the suspect would not receive a fair trial in Rwanda.

A Norwegian appeals court, this week, upheld an earlier ruling by a lower court ordering the extradition of Charles Bandora, one of the key suspects of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

The court ruled that there is no strong evidence to suggest that the suspect would not receive a fair trial in Rwanda.

Over the last 10 years, the Rwandan judicial system has undergone various reforms putting it at par with international standards.

Members of the judiciary have received intensive training, both academic and on-the-job, and now they have the capacity to deliver justice, professionally.

The reforms have also seen a backlog of cases concluded and the population now has confidence in the justice system.

Suspects living in various countries have continued to argue that, if extradited, they would not receive a fair trial. This has enabled Genocide suspects and other fugitives to evade justice.

However, following the reforms, it is clear that this excuse has gradually become obsolete.

The ruling by the Norwegian court and the recent deportation of another suspect from the US, demonstrates that foreign jurisdictions have gained confidence in the Rwandan justice system and the question of competence is steadily fading away.

Ends

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