Japanese envoy commissions new classrooms

Kayonza-The Japanese Ambassador to Rwanda, Kunio Hatanaka, yesterday, officially handed over eight classrooms worth Rwf 66 million to Kayonza Modern Secondary School, built with the support of the Japanese Government.Accompanied by several government officials, the envoy toured the school after the commissioning.
Japanese envoy to Rwanda Kunio Hatanaka engages students in laboratory tests during the commissioning of eight new classrooms at Kayonza Modern School The New Times /Stephen Rwembeho.
Japanese envoy to Rwanda Kunio Hatanaka engages students in laboratory tests during the commissioning of eight new classrooms at Kayonza Modern School The New Times /Stephen Rwembeho.

Kayonza- The Japanese Ambassador to Rwanda, Kunio Hatanaka, yesterday, officially handed over eight classrooms worth Rwf 66 million to Kayonza Modern Secondary School, built with the support of the Japanese Government.

Accompanied by several government officials, the envoy toured the school after the commissioning.

Addressing hundreds of parents, teachers and students, Hatanaka said that his government is committed to supporting Rwanda in her development programs.

“Investing in education has far reaching positive impact...this school will create the vital human resource needed in the country. Our support thus, had in mind such long term dividends,” he said.

The school’s head teacher, Steven Rwamurangwa, said that the increased number of classrooms would benefit the whole community.

He noted that due to good performance, the school had attracted many students leading to congestion.

The head teacher observed that they needed more classrooms to cater for the ever growing students’ population.

“Teachers and learners need space. It is disturbing for a teacher to handle over 60 students at ago. It is also true that congested students don’t learn easily. The increase in the number of classrooms is thus a remedy,” he said.

The Director of Planning in Eastern Province, Boniface Ntirenganya, reiterated the need to improve infrastructure in schools in the province.

He applauded the Japanese government for its support.

“We are going for the 12 year basic education program...this must be accompanied with an increase in the number of classrooms. The Japanese assistance hence comes at a time when we indeed needed it most,” Ntirenganya said.

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