Prosecution presents more damning evidence against Ingabire

KIGALI - On the fourth day of the trial in the case involving Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza and her co-accused, prosecution tabled evidence alleging that the four suspects had formed an armed group in the jungles of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) by the time of their arrest.
The accussed during a previous court appearance; More evidence presented by prosecution yesterday pinned Victoire Ingabire (right) to a terror group. The New Times /File.
The accussed during a previous court appearance; More evidence presented by prosecution yesterday pinned Victoire Ingabire (right) to a terror group. The New Times /File.

KIGALI - On the fourth day of the trial in the case involving Victoire Ingabire Umuhoza and her co-accused, prosecution tabled evidence alleging that the four suspects had formed an armed group in the jungles of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) by the time of their arrest.

The quartet include Lt. Colonels Tharcisse Nditurende and Noel Habiyaremye, Major Vital Uwumuremyi and Capt. Jean Marie Vianney Karuta.

They are charged with forming a terrorist group, conspiracy to wage war and conduct terror activities as well as forming an armed group with the aim of destabilising the country.

They four have pleaded guilty.

Presenting the evidence before the High Court yesterday, prosecutor Bonaventure Ruberwa said that the statements obtained from the four men by both prosecution and the judicial police confirm that they had formed an armed group.

“They formed an armed group called Coalition des Forces Democratique (CDF), a wing of Ingabire’s FDU-Inkingi after breaking away from FDLR,” Ruberwa said.

Court also heard that the group was formed mainly because Ingabire and the officers were disappointed by FDLR’s inactivity.

FDLR, a militia group based in the DRC, is mainly made up of perpetrators of the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

According to the accused, Ingabire asked them to recruit young FDLR rebels, who were ready to shift their activities to Rwanda instead of idling in Congolese jungles.

Prosecution averred that Ingabire told her co-defendants that they could not overthrow the government of Rwanda, but their aim would be to cause insecurity and force government to opt for talks.

Court heard that the Ingabire told  her co-accused that the reason the international community did not bother about Rwanda was that it was peaceful. So causing insecurity would coerce government into opting for a truce with them.

Additional evidence presented in court showed that Ingabire, through various people in Belgium, Tanzania, Uganda and DRC, sent her co-accused money to procure arms through Western Union.

Capt. Uwumuremyi who acted as the focal point between Ingabire and the commander of the force, Lt Col. Nditurende, was charged with receiving the money.

Uwumuremyi testified to have used the money to buy military equipment to prepare for subversive activities on Rwandan territory.

Prosecution also read several e-mails exchanges between Ingabire and the two asking them to do their part as she also does her part of politics and diplomacy.

Ingabire had also instructed that they recruit people from inside the country who would return and train others.

Prosecution is expected to begin reading Ingabire’s charges today.

Ends

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