Senatorial candidates should stick to the rules

A field of 57 senatorial candidates will, today, hit the campaign trail ahead of the September 26 and 27 elections. The aspirants are tussling it out for the 14 slots that are up for grabs in the Upper Chamber of Parliament, as the First Senate draws to an end. Twelve of the seats are reserved for the candidates who will be elected by the respective district councils and sector bureaus, while two will go to representatives of public and private tertiary institutions, one for each constituency.

A field of 57 senatorial candidates will, today, hit the campaign trail ahead of the September 26 and 27 elections.

The aspirants are tussling it out for the 14 slots that are up for grabs in the Upper Chamber of Parliament, as the First Senate draws to an end.

Twelve of the seats are reserved for the candidates who will be elected by the respective district councils and sector bureaus, while two will go to representatives of public and private tertiary institutions, one for each constituency.

Apart from the position designated for private institutions of higher learning, all the other slots have attracted a sizeable number of aspirants, with as many as 16 candidates – competing for three seats in the Southern Province.

Like in previous elections, the National Electoral Commission (NEC) has met with all the candidates and explained to them the rules governing the campaign. 

For instance, no candidate is allowed to use public resources to bankroll their campaigns. Each aspirant has a maximum of ten minutes to campaign before their respective Electoral Colleges, while equal airtime and space in the public media has been allotted to each of them.

It is imperative that the set rules are respected to ensure a level playing field for all the aspirants, and to avoid unnecessary punitive measures that include disqualification.

Furthermore, members of the Electoral Colleges should turn up for the campaign. It is important that the voters closely follow each and every candidate and what they have to offer. The media too should cover the candidates to help the voters make informed decisions.

Ends

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