Big turn-up at vehicle inspection centre

Following the establishment of a third lane at the Remera-based Motor Vehicle Inspection Centre (MIC), in April, the number of vehicles inspected has increased by 88.7 percent in the last three months. A total of 15, 547 vehicles were inspected between June and August, up from 8, 237 that were inspected between January and March, according to a police report.
 The launch of the third lane at the vehicle inspection centre has significantly bolstered service delivery at the centre. The New Times /File photo
The launch of the third lane at the vehicle inspection centre has significantly bolstered service delivery at the centre. The New Times /File photo

Following the establishment of a third lane at the Remera-based Motor Vehicle Inspection Centre (MIC), in April, the number of vehicles inspected has increased by 88.7 percent in the last three months.

A total of 15, 547 vehicles were inspected between June and August, up from 8, 237 that were inspected between January and March, according to a police report.

Currently, there are about 53, 000 vehicles in the country.

With the introduction of the third lane, the centre now has the capacity to inspect about 250 daily, up from 150 previously.

Speaking to The New Times, Supt. Dismas Rutaganira, the MIC Commanding Officer, said that the centre’s capacity has greatly improved.

 “We have enough staff to offer quick services and quality customer care,” Rutaganira said.

It takes about 10 minutes for a vehicle to be inspected.

The centre was established in 2008 to check the mechanical conditions of vehicles as a way of reducing traffic accidents caused by technical difficulties.

Vehicle mechanical problems are said to be among the causes of traffic accidents. Over 1, 095 deaths and 30, 000 injuries were recorded in the last three years.

The centre, which began its operations inspecting 15 vehicles per day, has so far inspected over 100, 000 cars.

All vehicles are subjected to a periodic technical inspection and those that are not roadworthy are required to be repaired before hitting the road again. Vehicles with four tyres are checked at a cost of Rwf 11, 800, commuters are screened at Rwf 17, 700 while vehicles with six wheels, with a capacity to carry between 19 and 29 passengers are charged Rwf 23, 600.

Owners of vehicles with 10 wheels, with a capacity of more than 30 people pay Rwf 29, 500 each to access the centre services.

The centre caters for both private and commercial vehicles and issues a certificate valid for one year and six months respectively after successful inspection.

The presidential decree No. 85/01 of September 2, 2002, regulating general traffic police and road traffic; stipulates, in part, that “vehicles not satisfying the set technical criteria will not be issued a certificate. Owners of vehicles using public roads without the certificate will be liable to a fine of Rwf 25, 000.”

MIC plans to decentralise its services to provinces, with Huye, Musanza and Rwamagana in the first phase. The centres are scheduled to be established in 22 towns across the country in the next five years.

Ends

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