IRDP unveils Peace and Security findings

A study conducted by a local think tank, the Institute of Research and Dialogue for Peace (IRDP), has shown that peace and security prevails in the country, 17 years after the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi. The study carried out over a one year period, aimed at scrutinising the state of peace in Rwanda as perceived by Rwandans in the post Genocide era.
Prof. Peter Rwanyindo Ruzirabwoba of local think tank IRPD (L), welcomes Local Government Minister, James Musoni,  to the meeting yesterday. The New Times /Timothy Kisambira
Prof. Peter Rwanyindo Ruzirabwoba of local think tank IRPD (L), welcomes Local Government Minister, James Musoni, to the meeting yesterday. The New Times /Timothy Kisambira

A study conducted by a local think tank, the Institute of Research and Dialogue for Peace (IRDP), has shown that peace and security prevails in the country, 17 years after the 1994 Genocide against the Tutsi.

The study carried out over a one year period, aimed at scrutinising the state of peace in Rwanda as perceived by Rwandans in the post Genocide era.

The research was carried out in all districts countrywide and among the Diaspora in Africa, Europe, and North America.

 Speaking at the launch of the findings, the Minister of Local Government, James Musoni, hailed IRDP for the initiative that promotes the country’s development.

“According to the research, the citizens are very happy with the stable peace and security in the country and they are commending remarkable progress it has achieved in a short period of time,” he said.

Musoni stated that the government would continue to ensure peace and security and as well as promote democracy which is the ultimate way to achieve development.

“We are pleased by the Rwandans who acknowledge the government’s commitment to promote good governance,” he noted.

He challenged researchers who conduct biased research to be honest in their surveys because the truth builds people and the nation.

The research highlights the achievements made in the post-genocide reconciliation and peace building process and the challenges faced but the country as it moves forward.

Prof. Peter Rwanyindo Ruzirabwoba, the Director of IRPD, said that the survey was conducted to involve Rwandans in an open dialogue to look for concrete solutions to solve problems they face.

“We are pleased by the findings because they reveal what is happening in the country 17 years after the 1994 Genocide,” he noted.

Prof. Rwanyindo called upon the government to put more efforts in addressing the challenges faced by Rwandans, especially poverty, ignorance and illiteracy, among others.

The survey acknowledges Rwanda Patriotic Front (RPF) for bringing peace and security, and the fact that they put an end to the Genocide is something the respondents would never forget.

“When citizens talk about the government of national unity, they do not seem to make any difference between RPF and the government,” the report adds.

According to Dr. Naasan Munyandamutsa, a researcher, the findings are crucial in fostering democratic governance.

“The impact of the research will depend on the receptiveness of the policy makers and the citizens towards encouraging the development process,” he noted.

Ends

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