Accidents in the E. Province on the rise

KAYONZA - Local authorities in the Eastern Province have decried the rising cases of road accidents in rural areas and appealed to all road users, including pedestrians, motor vehicle drivers, and cyclists to be more responsible.
 Mayors from the Eastern Province during a meeting to deliberate on rural roads safety precautions. The New Times /S. Rwembeho
Mayors from the Eastern Province during a meeting to deliberate on rural roads safety precautions. The New Times /S. Rwembeho

KAYONZA - Local authorities in the Eastern Province have decried the rising cases of road accidents in rural areas and appealed to all road users, including pedestrians, motor vehicle drivers, and cyclists to be more responsible.

They cited the Kayonza-Kibungo highway, which is under rehabilitation, as a blackspot.

The Mayor of Kayonza District, John Mugabo, said that the contractor had taken long to complete the project, hence exposing road users to accidents.

“At least three accidents per week are registered…the delay in the completion of the rehabilitation works is questionable. The potholes have made the road very rough, and are responsible for the accidents,” Mugabo narrated.

Jean Marie Makombe, the Executive Secretary of the Province, reiterated the significant increase in the number of road accidents which is unusual in rural areas.

The officials were speaking at a security meeting organised by the province, yesterday, where all stakeholders were challenged to check on the growing tide of accidents.

Nyagatare District mayor, Sabiti Atuhe, attributed these to recklessness.

He explained that traffic offenders take advantage of the little traffic police presence in rural areas to overload and over speed.

“In rural Nyagatare, a motorcycle carries three to four passengers at ago.
The motorbikes have neither insurance nor registration numbers…and are ridden by people without a driving license,” he lamented.

Mayor Louis Rwagaju of Bugesera District called for a quick intervention to bring the accidents to a halt.

Unlike tarmac roads, he said, where accidents had significantly reduced, unpaved rural road users continue to register accidents.

“Rural motorists have become unruly…they don’t even stop when they get involved in accidents. A situation where even trucks carry passengers, a situation that cannot be tolerated,” Rwagaju maintained.

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