Gov’t sets sugar retail price

The Government has finally fixed retail prices of sugar at Rwf 800 per kilo as earlier agreed by the country’s sole sugar manufacturer, Kabuye Sugar Works (KSW) and its distributors.The Minister of Trade and Commerce, Francois Kanimba, said that government agreed with traders to reduce the retail prices of sugar that is locally milled by Kabuye Sugar Works from the current Rwf 1,200 to Rwf 800.
Workers at Kabuye Sugar factory. Government has moved to contain the surging sugar prices. The New Times File.
Workers at Kabuye Sugar factory. Government has moved to contain the surging sugar prices. The New Times File.

The Government has finally fixed retail prices of sugar at Rwf 800 per kilo as earlier agreed by the country’s sole sugar manufacturer, Kabuye Sugar Works (KSW) and its distributors.

The Minister of Trade and Commerce, Francois Kanimba, said that government agreed with traders to reduce the retail prices of sugar that is locally milled by Kabuye Sugar Works from the current Rwf 1,200 to Rwf 800.


The enforcement of the new price, according to the Minister starts today.

The consumer prices of sugar registered an increase from Rwf 700 per kilogramme in May this year to Rwf1,200 by July.

“What we previously agreed with KSW, was to reduce the factory price to Rwf31,000 for a 50kg sack and distributors can sell at 33,500,” Kanimba said last evening during an interview with The New Times.

The General Manager of KSW, Gohil N.B, said their factory produces 10,500 tonnes per year, representing only 27 per cent of the required 40,000 tonnes.

Kanimba noted that this would help temporarily reduce the high price of sugar, as other means to import more sugar to bridge the supply deficit are being undertaken.

 “We have agreed that the retail price of Kabuye sugar in all shops and supermarkets must be at Rwf 800 and all traders must properly display the price where every customer is able to read,” said Mohammed Mazimpaka, the Secretary General, Champion Investments Corporation (CHIC) the  company that brings together all traders in Kigali City.

Meanwhile, the Minister added that common external tariffs have been waived to help increase sugar imports and reduce its prices .

 “We hope the duty free and the waiving of the surcharges of the common external tariff will help traders bring in sugar from countries that are outside the EAC and COMESA”, the minister said.

He further said that studies are being conducted to see how the production capacity of KWS could satisfy the local market.

Sugar prices have been surging in other countries in the region including Uganda, which was once one of the leading suppliers of the commodity to the Rwandan market.

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